THE MAN FROM ELYSIAN FIELDS

A Refuge in Hades?

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 27, 2002

Starring: Andy Garcia, Mick Jagger,
Julianna Marquelies, James
Coburn, and Angelica Huston

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 1 hour, 45 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn

Director: George Hickenlooper

Executive Producer: Norm Waitt, Paul Brooks, Larry
Katz, Morris Ruskin, and Vicky
Pike

Producer: Andrew Pfeffer, Donald
Zuckerman and Andy Garcia

Writer: Phillip Jayson Lasker

Address Comments To:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO
The Samuel Goldwyn Co.
10203 Santa Monica Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90067
Phone: (310) 552-2255
Fax: (310) 284-8493

Content:

(B, LL, SS, A, D) Morality tale set in a Christian allegorical worldview with too much foul content along the way; 12 obscenities and 2 profanities; 2 scenes of marital sex, 3 scenes of adultery, and graphic pictures of kama sutra; alcohol use; and, smoking.


Summary:

THE MAN FROM ELYSIAN FIELDS is a cool and elegant tale of a writer who strikes a Faustian bargain to work as a male escort and emerges a wiser, more temperate man as a result. This well-produced movie is a parable about the attraction of sin and the wages thereof. Extreme caution is urged for the sexual content.


Review:

THE MAN FROM ELYSIAN FIELDS is a cool and elegant tale of a writer who strikes a Faustian bargain and emerges a wiser, more temperate man as a result. Andy Garcia plays Byron Tiller, a struggling novelist, who lives in the poor section of Pasadena with a beautiful wife and son. Byron left a successful career in advertising to pursue his dream of writing.
After seven years, he published HITLER'S CHILD, based on the improbable premise that Hitler had a child that was raised in Argentina. While HITLER'S CHILD received glowing reviews, it sold poorly. Byron’s publisher is understandably reluctant to publish Byron’s second novel with an equally improbable premise.
Tingling with smart, witty dialogue that never bores, the movie takes you from Byron’s idyllic home life to his struggle to provide for his family. Unable to tell his wife that his second novel was rejected, nor to make the necessary overtures to please his wealthy father-in-law and secure a loan, Byron becomes desperate.
This is when Mick Jagger enters the scene, playing the man from Elysian Fields, Luther Fox (read Lucifer). Elysian Fields is a refuge in Hades for the virtuous in Virgil’s “Aenid” and is also the title of Luther’s upscale escort service for lonely women. It’s clear that Luther is a metaphor for the person of temptation himself, Satan. If Byron can get used to just taking women out for an evening, he’ll be able to support his family while he continues to write…. or so he tells himself. When he escorts Alycia Allcott, the wife of famous author Tobias Allcot, to the opera, he slowly slips into infidelity.
Even though both men commit abhorrent acts, the director is able to make both characters sympathetic. Byron Tiller hates what he’s doing but feels he has no choice. Luther Fox has only one client, played equally well by Angelica Huston. In a moment of clarity, Luther realizes he’s in love with her and proposes to this woman, who in turn, laughs at him. Clearly portrayed is this message: While sin offers us pleasure in the moment, it fails to provide any lasting fulfillment.
This movie is a parable about the attraction of sin and the wages thereof. With a sparkling script, dream cast, and slyly elegant directing, THE MAN FROM ELYSIAN FIELDS is completely engaging. As a cautionary tale, it has immorality and profanity. There is nudity shown in pictures of the Kama Sutra lining Luther’s office walls. There are scenes of men drinking through out the movie.
The movie is clearly for mature adult audiences only, but the moral, which the L.A. Times called “old fashioned” and “dryly amusing” is a Christian moral. As Luther Fox sums up in the movie’s last line; “I’d spent years learning to pleasure many women, but Byron had learned that life was about pleasing just one. Now, that’s something to write about.”
Extreme caution is recommend for the sexual content.


In Brief:

THE MAN FROM ELYSIAN FIELDS is a cool and elegant tale of a writer who strikes a Faustian bargain and emerges a wiser, more temperate man as a result. Andy Garcia plays Byron Tiller, a struggling novelist, who becomes desperate. Mick Jagger playing Luther Fox (read Lucifer) is the man from Elysian Fields, a refuge in Hades in Virgil’s “Aenid” and the name of Luther’s upscale escort service for lonely women. If Byron can get used to just taking women out for an evening, he’ll be able to support his family while he continues to write. When he escorts the wife of a famous author, to the opera, he slips into infidelity.
This movie is a parable about the attraction of sin and the wages thereof. With a sparkling script and slyly elegant directing, THE MAN FROM ELYSIAN FIELDS is completely engaging. As a cautionary tale, it has immorality, profanity and nudity shown in pictures of the Kama Sutra lining Luther’s office walls. It’s for mature adult audiences only, but the moral, which the L.A. Times called “old fashioned” and “dryly amusing” is a Christian moral. Extreme caution is recommend for the sexual content.