THE SEVENTH COIN Add To My Top 10

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Alexandra Powers, Navin Chowdhry, Peter O'Toole, John Rhys-Davies, & Ally Walker

Genre: Action adventure

Audience:

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 91 minutes

Distributor: Hemdale Communications

Director: Dror Soref

Executive Producer:

Producer: Dror Soref & Michael Lewis

Writer: Lee Nelson & Omri Maron

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Content:

(L, VV, NN, S) 1 obscenity & 4 profanities; two characters strangled, three characters shot to death & elderly man beaten; brief but full male & female nudity in a bathhouse; teenaged lovers start to undress but are interrupted; and, stealing by major character, but not condoned.

Summary:

THE SEVENTH COIN is a shoestring action film that will migrate to video stores in a few weeks. Despite some colorful on-location settings in the old city of Jerusalem and the rental of Peter O'Toole (who must be very hungry for work), this is little more than an inept after-school adventure. Needless profanity, nudity and violence, apparently added to secure a PG-13 rating, add nothing to the overall mix.

Review:

THE SEVENTH COIN begins in Jerusalem where American teenager Ronnie is visiting some friends. Salim is a young Arab who will steal anything in sight to help feed his grandfather, a dignified gentleman who condemns thievery. When Salim runs off with Ronnie's camera case, all sorts of havoc breaks loose. Salim's grandfather is hiding a rare coin bearing the image of King Herod. Only seven exist, and six are in the possession of Lt. Emil Saber (Peter O'Toole). Saber is gaunt, ruthless and violently delusional, determined to secure the lost coin at any cost. After his henchmen brutally beat Grandpa, the old man stashes the coin in the stolen camera case. So begins a chase for the coin. Overall, THE SEVENTH COIN is a thin adventure, although more skillful writing and acting (not to mention editing out the useless, offensive material) might have salvaged it.

Despite some colorful on-location settings in the old city of Jerusalem and the rental of Peter O'Toole (who must be very hungry for work), this is little more than an inept after-school adventure. Why those who invested so much time, effort and money on this project didn't first secure a better developed story and a decent script remains a mystery. Needless profanity, nudity and violence, apparently added to secure a PG-13 rating, add nothing to the overall mix.

In Brief: