TURTLE BEACH

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 01, 1992

Starring: Greta Scacchi, Joan Chen, Jack Thompson, Art Malik, Norman Kaye, Victoria Longley, & Martin Jacobs

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 85 minutes

Distributor: Warner Brothers

Director: Stephen Wallace

Executive Producer:

Producer: Ann Turner ON THE NOVEL BY: Blanche d'Alpuget

Writer: Matt Carroll

Address Comments To:

Content:

(L, VVV, SSS, NNN, FR) Less than five obscenities; extreme, graphic violence by machetes in slaughter of Vietnamese boat people by Malaysians; several fornication and adulterous scenes with total female nudity; and, worship of Buddha (but ties in with Malaysian setting).


Summary:

TURTLE BEACH is about an Aussie journalist, Judith, who comes to Malaysia to do a story on the Vietnamese boat people. The movie fails due to a poorly developed story, drab cinematography and unbelievable acting.


Review:

In TURTLE BEACH, an Australian journalist, Judith, comes to Malaysia to do a story on the Vietnamese boat people, after leaving her boys and husband in Australia. Many boat people come ashore on Turtle Beach, the mating ground of the rare Green Turtle. She discovers that the Malaysians consider Turtle Beach off limits, since, when the refugees try to come ashore, the Malaysians club them to death. Judith befriends the Australian ambassador's wife, Chen, a former Saigon barmaid, who wants her children back. As an aside, Judith fornicates twice with an Indian black marketeer, Kanan. One night, Chen takes Judith to Turtle Beach to wait for a Vietnamese refugee boat. Judith saves a few refugees. However, a mob appears, wades into the water and clubs the refugees until they die. One wonders whether it was necessary to portray such gore given the inadequateness of the remainder of the film.
TURTLE BEACH never gets off the ground. Not only is the cinematography flawed, but also the story line suffers from unevenness and inadequate development. Scacchi, in addition, is unflatteringly photographed and appears ill-at-ease throughout the film.


In Brief: