VALENTINE

Revenge of the Nerd

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 02, 2001

Starring: David Boreanaz, Denise
Richards, Jessica Capshaw,
Marley Shelton, & Katherine
Heigl

Genre: Horror

Audience: Teenagers & young adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 95 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros.

Director: Jamie Blanks

Executive Producer: Grant Rosenberg & Bruce Berman

Producer: Dylan Sellers

Writer: Donna Powers, Wayne Powers,
Gretchen J. Berg, & Aaron
Harberts

Address Comments To:

Barry A. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Warner Bros., Inc.
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(PaPa, Ab, LLL, VVV, S, NN, AA, D, M) Tragic pagan worldview & brief anti-biblical scene mocking young man who says, “The Bible is the foundation of morality & marriage”; at least 27 obscenities, 6 strong profanities, 11 mild profanities, & a couple crude sexual remarks; strong horror slasher violence such as killer pushes woman’s neck down onto jagged glass, killer stabs woman through hot tub glass, scary images of corpses in medical school, & other stabbings, plus woman hits suspect with champagne bottle & woman ties up obnoxious man & drips hot wax on his private parts after he expresses crude sexual desire; implied fornication, policeman makes sexual pass at female suspect & woman tricks nude man who expresses crude sexual desire; upper male nudity & upper female nudity; alcohol use & man with drinking problem gets drunk; smoking; and, revenge & killer survives & doesn’t get caught at end of movie.

Summary:

In the horror movie VALENTINE, a nerd takes revenge on the girls who hurt him in junior high school and gets away with it. Although somewhat restrained compared to other such movies, VALENTINE still provides yet another example of the kind of violence which has led to actual violence in real life and includes some strong foul language, brief nudity, some sexual content, and a short scene mocking people of faith.

Review:

VALENTINE may be better produced than other horror movies about a vicious killer stalking a group of young people. It also does not contain as much bloody violence and crude material as other horror movies. Nevertheless, it has enough moral problems not to recommend it. It is also certain to provoke a copycat crime somewhere sometime among the teenagers and young adults that are its target audience. Furthermore, it corrupts a Christian holiday commemorating a martyred Christian bishop who was beheaded in about 270 A.D. by order of Claudius II, Emperor of Rome.

In the story, five girls at a junior high dance mistreat the school nerd, Jeremy, who also gets beaten up by a group of boys after one of the girls, Dorothy, claims he tried to assault her. Thirteen years later, a killer with a mask murders one of the girls and sends violent Valentine cards to the other four. One of the remaining girls turns up missing, but Dorothy, whose father is a rich man, still plans to hold a Valentine’s Day Party at her family’s wealthy mansion. More mayhem then ensues.

VALENTINE tries to build suspense rather than merely assault viewers with violent images. At the same time, the concept behind the movie – a killer stalks people for revenge – is problematic. This is especially true because the killer apparently gets away with his murderous crimes at the end. Also in the end, the suspense gives way to the inevitable bloody violence. Although somewhat restrained compared to other such movies, VALENTINE still provides yet another example of the kind of violence which has led to actual violence in real life. The movie also includes some strong foul language, brief nudity and some sexual content. There is also a short scene mocking people of faith.

In Brief:

In the horror movie VALENTINE, five girls at a junior high dance mistreat the school nerd, Jeremy, who also gets beaten up by a group of boys after one of the girls, Dorothy, claims he tried to assault her. Thirteen years later, a killer with a mask murders one of the girls and sends violent Valentine cards to the other four. One of the girls turns up missing, but Dorothy, whose father is a rich man, still plans to hold a Valentine’s Day Party at her family’s wealthy mansion. More mayhem then ensues.

VALENTINE tries to build suspense rather than merely assault viewers with violent images. At the same time, the concept behind the movie – a killer stalks people for revenge – is problematic. This is especially true because the killer apparently gets away with his murderous crimes at the end. Also in the end, the suspense gives way to the inevitable bloody violence. Despite its restraint, VALENTINE still provides yet another example of the kind of violence which has led to actual violence in real life. The movie also includes some strong foul language, brief nudity, sexual content, and a short scene mocking people of faith.