WEATHER GIRL

A Rainy Forecast

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 10, 2009

Starring: Tricia O’Kelley, Patrick J.
Adams, Ryan Devlin, Mark
Harmon, Jon Cryer, Jane Lynch,
and Kaitlin Olson

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: Secret Identity Productions

Director: Blayne Weaver

Executive Producer: Brandon Barrera

Producer: Tricia O’Kelley and Steak
House

Writer: Blayne Weaver

Address Comments To:

Secret Identity Productions
1816 ½ Santa Ynez Street
Los Angeles, CA 90026
Phone: (310) 213-8045
Website: www.secretidentityproductions.com

Content:

(RoRo, Pa, B, LLL, V, S, N, AA, D, MM) Strong Romantic worldview including characters who live pagan lifestyles, plus one reference to God where character says “God is mad at me”; 66 obscenities and 30 profanities; very light comic violence when woman runs into another woman’s fist and falls down; some sexual references including distasteful, flippant statements about certain male body parts and certain female body parts, teenage boy hits on main character, kitchen staff at main character’s job make sexually suggestive comments to her in Spanish, three instances of implied fornication, couple is found sleeping in bed together, couple starts to fornicate but are interrupted, and it is implied that man and woman lived together for a time; woman wears only a sweatshirt, upper male nudity, woman undresses twice to her bra and underwear; strong alcohol references include characters drink beer, characters drink wine with dinner, character becomes alcoholic and is played for laughs, one character says he has started drinking heavily since he was rejected by the woman he loves; character smokes next to a No Smoking sign; and, woman lies to her brother about her relationship, sex outside of marriage is promoted as “normal,” man cheats on his girlfriend, main character’s friends tell her that getting a man is the final fulfilling accomplishment in life, brother tells main character to lower her standards, one character comments, “This is the world, we don’t always get to do what we want to do,” and character attributes her “deficiencies” to her mother’s death and her father’s poor parenting and believes she is able to overcome these on her own.

Summary:

WEATHER GIRL is a rather disappointing, formulaic romantic comedy about a weather anchor, Sylvia, who gets fired from her job and is forced to reevaluate her life after flipping out on air following the discovery that her boyfriend is cheating on her with his co-host. Apart from a couple laugh-out-loud moments, the movie suffers from poorly written dialogue, over-acting, and formulaic directing, coupled with a strong Romantic worldview, foul language, and implied fornication that merit extreme caution.

Review:

The indie movie WEATHER GIRL is a disappointing, formulaically directed romantic comedy that starts off somewhat humorously and then deteriorates as it continues.

The movie opens with Sylvia who works as a weather reporter for the Seattle Daily Morning Show. After discovering her boyfriend, the show’s anchor, has been cheating on her with his co-host, Sylvia flips out in an angry rant during a live broadcast. This outburst results in the loss of her job.

Forced to live with her immature, younger brother, Walt, while trying to get back on her feet, Sylvia, aka “Sassy Weather Girl,” soon discovers the cost of her reckless actions to her career as she is unable to find anyone in television willing to hire her. At the same time, her brother’s best friend, Byron, has taken an interest in her. They begin a casual, no-strings-attached sexual relationship, only to eventually fall in love with each other.

The plot of this story is very simple, so simple in fact that it becomes boring and almost painful to watch as the actors overcompensate for the poorly written dialogue and formulaic directing. Their attempts to make the story more engaging fall short, especially considering that the romantic relationship seemed less than believable due to the incompatibility in the developmental stages of each character. With not much to commend the movie apart from a couple laugh-out-loud moments and the mostly supportive, sometimes dysfunctional brother-sister relationship between Sylvia and Walt, extreme caution is advised due to the strong Romantic worldview, foul language, and implied fornication. WEATHER GIRL also sends the message that people can “become better” by overcoming their own “deficiencies” without God’s help. Nothing could be further from the truth that rests in relying on Jesus Christ, the Word of God who saves us from sin, justifies us and sanctifies us for the good works that God has appointed us to do.

In Brief:

The indie movie WEATHER GIRL is a rather disappointing, formulaic romantic comedy about Sylvia, a weather anchor. Sylvia gets fired after flipping out on air following the discovery that her boyfriend is cheating on her with his co-host. Forced to live with her younger brother, Walt, while she tries getting back on her feet, Sylvia soon discovers the cost of her reckless actions – she is unable to find anyone in television willing to hire her. At the same time, her brother’s best friend has taken an interest in her. They begin a casual, no-strings-attached relationship, only to eventually fall in love with each other.

The plot of this story is so simple that it becomes boring and almost painful to watch as the actors overcompensate for the movie’s poorly written dialogue and formulaic directing. Their attempts to make the story more engaging fall short. Apart from a couple of laugh-out-loud moments, extreme caution is advised for WEATHER GIRL. This is due to its strong Romantic worldview, plenty of R-rated foul language, scenes of implied fornication, and the message that people can “become better” by overcoming their own “deficiencies” without God’s help.