FAST FOOD NATION

Content:

(PaPa, B, C, Ab, Ho, Cap, ACapACapACap, PCPCPC, EE, LLL, VV, SS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Mixed pagan worldview in which many of the characters are driven by money and/or lust (although their motivations are rebuked with biting satire), with some moral elements of compassion and hard work, some minor Christian elements when a woman holds a cross on her necklace and prays for her husband, a reference to hypocritical Christians, homosexual elements including brief sounds of a lesbian porn scene (although not depicted), some capitalist elements, and some very strong anti-capitalist elements depicting corporate corruption and unethical business practices, plus a strong environmentalist slant including a character who leads a group of environmentalist protestors; very strong foul language with at least 74 obscenities including many ‘f’ words and two light profanities; one disturbing scene of intense graphic violence depicting a man’s legs being sliced up by a factory machine; lots of sexual humor and a brief sex scene depicted; upper female nudity in a sexual context and one scene of naturalistic upper male nudity; several scenes in bars depicting moderate alcohol use; characters depicted smoking marijuana and several characters are addicted to amphetamines; and, lying, bad role models, racism.

Summary:

FAST FOOD NATION is a comedy drama about a fast food chain’s marketing director investigating why his company’s meat has become contaminated. With an uneven story, an inexcusable amount of foul language, and an inarticulate anti-capitalist message, you’ll want to abstain from FAST FOOD NATION

Review:

FAST FOOD NATION is a fictionalized comedy drama inspired by Eric Schlosser’s best-selling non-fiction book of the same title. Directed by Richard Linklater, this ensemble narrative attempts to explore some of the problems within the fast food industry.
When executives at Mickey’s, America’s most popular fast food restaurant, discover that their meat patties have been contaminated with fecal matter, they send marketing director Don (Greg Kinnear) on a mission to find the cause. As he journeys to the company’s meat packing plant and several of their fast food restaurants, Don’s investigation reveals a supersized level of corruption and unethical behavior. The movie also explores the industry through the eyes of illegal immigrants working at the factory, as well as teenagers working in one of the nearby locations.
Instead of being a documentary, the FAST FOOD NATION narrates the story from the perspective of several different people involved in the industry. The objective of turning a nonfiction work of polemical journalism into a fictional movie sounds like a daunting task, and the results are half-baked. Although the movie begins with Don investigating the company’s meat contamination problem, the story clumsily drifts from Don’s eyes to the perspective of illegal immigrants, a restless high school student, and other factory workers. The transitions are often awkward, and the peripheral drama surrounding the characters’ lives is distracting and often unrelated to the main story.
Despite the uneven story, one of the movie’s consistencies is offensive content throughout. The movie contains an inexcusable amount of foul language, and its anti-capitalist message is both inarticulate and annoying. If you’re hoping to stay on a good-movie diet, you’ll want to abstain from FAST FOOD NATION.

In Brief:

FAST FOOD NATION is a fictionalized comedy inspired by Eric Schlosser’s best-selling non-fiction book of the same title. When executives at Mickey’s, America’s most popular fast food restaurant, discover that their meat patties have been contaminated with fecal matter, they send marketing director Don to find the cause. As he journeys to the company’s meat packing plant and several of their fast food restaurants, Don’s investigation reveals a supersized level of corruption and unethical behavior. The movie also explores the industry through the eyes of illegal immigrants working at the factory, as well as teenagers working in one of the nearby locations. Instead of being a documentary, the FAST FOOD NATION narrates the story from the perspective of several different people involved in the industry. The transitions are often awkward, and the peripheral drama surrounding the characters’ lives is often distracting. Despite the uneven story, one of the movie’s consistencies is offensive content throughout. The movie contains an inexcusable amount of foul language, and its anti-capitalist message is both inarticulate and annoying. If you’re hoping to stay on a good-movie diet, you’ll want to abstain from FAST FOOD NATION.