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JOCKEY

"One Last Shot"

What You Need To Know:

JOCKEY is a character study about a veteran horse racing jockey. Jackson is an aging jockey who’s seen better days, but he’s still looking for one final championship. He may have found it when the owner and trainer for whom he works has a horse that has the makings of a champion. However, Jackson’s suffering from a minor neurological problem, or something worse. Meanwhile, a young jockey on the circuit, Gabriel, thinks Jackson is his father. Jackson doesn’t think it’s possible, but he takes a liking to the boy and starts teaching him the ropes.

JOCKEY is a well-acted drama with good plot points and jeopardy. Clifton Collins, Jr. does an excellent job in the title role. The mentor relationship between Jackson and Gabriel is a touching one, even when their relationship hits a bump in the road. Also, there’s a great scene where a Christian chaplain prays with the jockeys before a race. However, after the prayer, Jackson says he doesn’t believe in an afterlife. JOCKEY also contains lots of strong foul language and some drunkenness. So, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.

Content:

(PaPa, B, C, H, Ab, LLL, V, N, AA, D, M):

Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Mixed pagan worldview with some moral elements and an overt Christian prayer in the name of Jesus but some pagan behavior (including foul language and drunkenness) and lead male character says he doesn’t believe in an afterlife in a scene that occurs after the community prayer scene

Foul Language:
49 obscenities (including many “f” and “s” words), one GD profanity and two light profanities

Violence:
Man has a neurological problem that eventually causes him to fall

Sex:
No sex

Nudity:
Upper male nudity in two or three scenes

Alcohol Use:
Alcohol use and some drunkenness

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
Smoking; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Man falsely accuses another man of lying, but the other man honestly was telling the truth as he thought it was.

More Detail:

JOCKEY is a character study of a veteran horse racing jockey suffering from a neurological disorder whose friend has a possible winning horse he can ride to victory and who mentors a young jockey who thinks the older man might be his father. JOCKEY is a well-acted drama with some good plot points and jeopardy, but there’s lots of strong foul language and the protagonist says he doesn’t believe in an afterlife despite an uplifting Christian prayer he and the other jockeys participate in during one scene before a race.

Jackson Silva is an aging jockey who’s seen better days, but he’s still looking to ride some more horses into the winning circle before he retires. He usually rides horses trained by his friend, Ruth Wilkes, who’s about the same age as he. One day, she approaches him about a young horse she just bought who appears to have the makings of a champion. Jackson looks at the horse and rides him and agrees with Ruth’s assessment about the horse’s potential.

Recently, however, Jackson has been experiencing some numbness and cramping in his right hand and arm. Secretly, he’s consulted one of the horse vets. The vet tells Jackson the problem is probably related to the fact that he’s suffered three broken backs during his career. He offers to give him the name of a good human surgeon, but Jackson declines.

Meanwhile, Jackson hears that a young jockey on the circuit, Gabriel, thinks Jackson is his father. Jackson knew Gabriel’s mother, but he tells Gabriel it’s not possible. However, Jackson takes a liking to the boy and starts teaching him the ropes about being a jockey.

JOCKEY is a well-acted drama with some good plot points and jeopardy. Clifton Collins, Jr. does an excellent, award-worthy job in the title role. He garners a lot of sympathy as the aging jockey looking for one more championship trophy.

The mentor relationship between Jackson and Gabriel is a touching one, even when their relationship hits a big bump in the road. Jackson also has a close, platonic friendship with Ruth, the owner and trainer of the new hopeful champion horse. Also, there’s a great scene where a Christian chaplain prays with the jockeys before a race. The chaplain prays in the name of Jesus in that scene.

However, after the prayer scene, Jackson tells someone he doesn’t believe in an afterlife. Life has been too disappointing for him to have such a hope. JOCKEY also contains lots of strong foul language and some drunkenness. So, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.