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ALL DOGS GO TO HEAVEN 2

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What You Need To Know:

In ALL DOGS GO TO HEAVEN 2, a canine duo named Charlie and Itchy are sent from heaven back to earth to retrieve the missing Gabriel's horn without which the gates to heaven cannot be opened and new dogs cannot go to heaven. The film is too heavy-handed with its many plots, has little character development and imparts negative and unbiblical messages of heaven and salvation.

More Detail:

The sequel ALL DOGS GO TO HEAVEN 2 features Charlie and Itchy, who are sent back to earth to retrieve the missing Gabriel’s horn. Without the horn, the gates of heaven cannot be opened and new dogs cannot enter heaven. Charlie, bored with the niceness of heaven and eager for earthly pleasures, is sent to earth to get the horn but is distracted when he falls in love with a singer Sasha. He locates the horn but has to battle Red, the devil in disguise, who wants the horn for his dark schemes. Charlie faces up to his responsibilities, banishes Red and is rewarded by having a second chance to live on earth with Sasha.

The film is laden with so many plots that focus is lost through the fuss. There are too many things happening and little to appreciate. Character development is sacrificed, the songs sound contrived and the final battle between Charlie and Red is predictable. Heaven is seen mainly through the eyes of Charlie, who sees it as being too nice and yearns for more earthly challenges. This error is never corrected in the film — instead, the story grants Charlie his wish to pursue earthly pleasures for doing good. This image and representation of heaven is void of any religious context and with its unbiblical premise should prove to be a matter of deep concern when taking the young to see this cartoon fantasy