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THE BEAR: SEASON 2

"The Bear is Back with a Roar"

What You Need To Know:

The Bear returns for a second season featuring enfant terrible Carmen “Carmy” Berzatto and his sous chef, Sydney Adamu. Carmy, Sydney, and their staff set out to transform the decrepit “Original Beef House” into a respectable fine dining establishment: “The Bear.” The neurotic but determined Carmy fights to make his restaurant succeed in spite of his financial troubles, dysfunctional family, and unresolved grief over his brother, the restaurant’s founder.

Carmy’s primary objective, to honor his late brother’s legacy, is admirable. Although he is prone to losing his temper, he demonstrates time and again that he cares deeply for the people who share this vision, especially his family members and his right hand, Sydney. The bonds between them are strengthened as they learn to act selflessly towards each other. Although the series is blemished by foul language, uses of the Lord’s name in vain, and a brief, ambiguous sex scene, its core themes of family, friendship, love, and determination are consistent with a moral worldview. Teenagers and adults should exercise caution when choosing whether to view this imperfect but artistically and morally compelling program.

Content:

(LLL, V, S, M)

Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Family and friendship are central, characters who initially mistreat each other grow to be selfless and value one another, familial bonds stay strong in the face of dysfunction and tribulation, the protagonist’s objective is to honor his brother’s memory and make him proud with his work, characters learn to apologize and take responsibility for their actions.

Foul Language:
Heavy foul language (including frequent F-words), uses of the Lord’s name in vain (especially “J---s C----t”).

Violence:
Minor scenes of fisticuffs when characters lose their temper.

Sex:
One brief, ambiguous sex scene where we see only the silhouettes of an unmarried couple in bed.

Nudity:
None.

Alcohol Use:
Mild alcohol use, no drunkenness depicted.

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
Several major characters smoke cigarettes regularly, a minor character smokes crack in an alley, but it is condemned.

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Heavy family dysfunction involving mental illness and verbal abuse, characters act selfishly but mostly change throughout the season.

More Detail:

FX’s Emmy-nominated culinary drama The Bear returns for a thrilling second season as enfant terrible Carmen “Carmy” Berzatto and his sous chef, Sydney Adamu, set out to transform the decrepit “Original Beef House” into a respectable fine dining establishment: “The Bear.” Beleaguered by his distinct brand of neuroticism, Carmy fights to see his restaurant brought to life in spite of his financial troubles, dysfunctional family, and unresolved grief over his brother, Michael, the Original Beef House’s founder, who committed suicide and left the establishment to Carmy prior to season one.

Once again, Christopher Storer, The Bear’s creator and showrunner, pushes the envelope of cable television with unconventional editing, ambitious camera work, and a singularly complex antihero. Jeremy Allen White reprises his role as Carmy Berzatto, whose moniker gives the show its title. Carmy’s mental instability, established in the first season, is explored more deeply, including in a flashback episode to before his brother’s death that displays the Berzatto clan’s dysfunction in all its proverbial glory. White’s brilliant performance elicits compassion and disapprobation in equal measure, as the viewer empathizes with Carmy’s considerable struggles while smacking their forehead in irritation at his unwillingness to grow beyond them. As in season one, the writing is stellar, with Carmy, Sydney, Richie, Natalie, and the rest of the characters taken to new depths. The show’s premise is straightforward; nevertheless, the viewer is on the edge of their seat through every minute.

For all his faults, Carmy’s primary objective is estimable: to honor his late brother’s legacy by turning his restaurant into an establishment that he would be proud of. Although he is prone to losing his temper and cursing out his staff, he demonstrates time and again that he cares deeply for the men and women who share this vision, especially his sister, Natalie, his cousin Richie, and his right hand, Sydney. The bond between the four of them, and the rest of the chefs at the Bear, is essential for their mutual success and is strengthened as they learn to act selflessly towards each other. Although the series is blemished by heavy foul language, uses of the Lord’s name in vain, and a brief, ambiguous sex scene, its core themes of family, friendship, love, and determination in the face of trials both inner and outward are consistent with a moral, biblical worldview. Teenagers and adults should exercise caution when choosing whether or not to view this imperfect but artistically and morally compelling program.

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4000+ Faith Based Articles and Movie Reviews – Will you Support Us?

Our small team works tirelessly to provide resources to protect families from harmful media, reviewing 415 movies/shows and writing 3,626 uplifting articles this year. We believe that the gospel can transform entertainment. That’s why we emphasize positive and faith-filled articles and entertainment news, and release hundreds of Christian movie reviews to the public, for free. No paywalls, just trusted, biblically sound content to bless you and your family. Online, Movieguide is the closest thing to a biblical entertainment expert at your fingertips. As a reader-funded operation, we welcome any and all contributions – so if you can, please give something. It won’t take more than 52 seconds (we timed it for you). Thank you.

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