BABYLON A.D.

Confused, Chaotic Mess

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 29, 2008

Starring: Vin Diesel, Michelle Yeoh,
Gerard Depardieu, Melanie
Thierry, Charlotte Rampling,
Lambert Wilson, and Mark
Strong

Genre: Science Fiction

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 or 101 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Director: Mathieu Kassovitz

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Ilan Goldman

Writer: Mathieu Kassovitz and Eric
Besnard

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO of News Corp.
Peter Chernin, President/COO of The Fox Group
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen/CEO
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
(Fox Searchlight Pictures and Fox Atomic)
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(PaPa, C, B, Ab, O, H, LL, VVV, S, N, A, D, M) Strong but unresolved and somewhat vague New Age pagan worldview that’s rather syncretistic or mixed, plus some light, slightly positive references to Jesus Christ, Christianity and God, but also unresolved, with high priestess of some sort of new New Age/Christian sect with a secret convent in Mongolia and headquartered in New York City is a villain, some apparent occult powers and some pseudo-scientific humanist mumbo jumbo about computer artificial intelligence being linked with human genes that’s also not clarified; 20 obscenities (including one “f” word) and two strong profanities; very strong action violence with some blood includes shooting in cold blood, cage fighting, explosions, powerful terrorist bomb explodes, gunfights with machine guns, missiles explode, dead polar bears with bloody wounds, stealth drone jets shoot at and fire missiles at people trying to cross Canadian border, vehicles crash during chase, and woman shot in chest with some blood; man in towel and young woman in slightly revealing T-shirt and panties almost kiss, a threat is made that contains a crude reference to prostitution, a “virgin birth” pregnancy is part of the plot; upper male nudity and woman in slightly revealing T-shirt and panties but nothing sexually explicit, skin wise; alcohol use; smoking; and, hero has tattoos.

Summary:

BABYLON A.D. stars Vin Diesel as a mercenary in the future who is hired to take a young woman with some kind of religious significance from Mongolia to New York City. This action movie contains some foul language, lots of strong action violence and a rather vague, unclear, mixed-up New Age worldview that’s never resolved.

Review:

An international production with a French director, BABYLON A.D. is a chaotic and confused mess that plays around with religious concepts in a vague, sometimes offensive, way that’s never resolved.

Set in the near future a few decades from now and based on an acclaimed 1999 French science fiction novel, the movie stars Vin Diesel as Toorop, a mercenary down on his luck and living in a war-torn Eastern Europe. A former boss hires him to take a young woman named Aurora from a New Age/Christian convent in Mongolia to New York City. Accompanying them is a nun, named Rebeka, who became Aurora’s adoptive mother when the orphan was left there. The trip is arduous and dangerous, with many action scenes. When they arrive in New York, Toorop realizes the girl is the object of a power struggle between the evil high priestess of Rebeka’s sect and the international gang led by his Russian boss.

MOVIEGUIDE® can see why Vin Diesel was attracted to this role. The story has some nice action sequences with good special effects and takes him from a tough guy survivor to a man who finds his worth measured as a compassionate protector of the weak, including children. His character learns that Aurora is pregnant with twins but by some kind of “virgin birth.”

This is where the movie gets confusing and silly. The high priestess of the nun’s New Age/Christian sect wants to use the miracle of the twins to grab power somehow. Power to do what is never quite clear. Images of Jesus and the Cross appear in the movie, making it sometimes seem as if this sect could be a Christian one and that the movie has a positive Christian worldview, but these themes are never developed. Although the nun and the high priestess make references to God, there is no theological meat to the bones of their faith. Furthermore, the somewhat bizarre and unresolved references to the virgin birth of Aurora’s twins is offensive, even though the movie avoids making any anti-Christian meaning out of that plot device (the French novel BABYLON BABIES on which it’s based may be a different matter).

Thus, the movie leaves viewers in the dark. And, it throws in some references to artificial intelligence, which clouds the issue even further, including the religious significance of Aurora and her twins. The movie’s worldview is clearly New Age and syncretistic, but the theological and moral content beyond that is unclear. Therefore, it’s better to avoid this movie and spend your time seeking spiritual truth and knowledge by reading what the Bible itself actually says about Jesus Christ, our Divine Lord and Savior. The Bible is very clear on the divine nature and divine message of Jesus Christ and His Gospel. It’s also a beautifully written, inspiring, profound, and sublime collection of works that brings us closer in communion and fellowship with our Divine Creator, the one and only God.

In Brief:

BABYLON A.D. is a science fiction movie set a few decades from now. It stars Vin Diesel as Toorop, a mercenary down on his luck and living in a war-torn Eastern Europe. A former boss hires him to take a young woman named Aurora from a New Age/Christian convent in Mongolia to New York City. Accompanying them is a nun, named Rebeka, who became Aurora’s adoptive mother when the orphan was left there. The trip is arduous and dangerous, with many action scenes. When they arrive in New York, it turns out that Aurora has miraculously conceived twins. She has become the object of a power struggle between the evil high priestess of Rebeka’s sect and the international gang led by Toorop’s Russian boss.

BABYLON A.D. never resolves what’s really happening. Images of Jesus and the Cross appear, making it sometimes seem as if the nun’s sect could be a Christian one and that the movie has a positive Christian worldview. These themes are never developed, however. In fact, the movie adopts a New Age, syncretistic worldview, but there’s little or no clear theological content behind it.