BRATZ

Brattitude

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 03, 2007

Starring: Nathalia Ramos, Janel Parrish,
Logan Browning, Skyler Shaye,
Chelsea Staub, Jon Voight, Ian
Nelson, and Stephan Lunsford

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older children and teenagers

Rating: PG

Runtime: 102 minutes

Distributor: Lionsgate

Director: Sean McNamara

Executive Producer: Benedict Carver

Producer: Avi Arad, Isaac Larian and
Steven Paul

Writer: Susan Estelle Jansen

Address Comments To:

John Feltheimer and Peter E. Strauss
Co-Chairmen
Lionsgate
AKA Lions Gate Films
2700 Colorado Ave.
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: (310) 449-9200
Fax: (310) 255-3870
Website: www.lionsgatefilms.com

Content:

(B, Ro, LL, V, M) Light moral worldview with light Romantic elements about being yourself and the immoral effects of high-school cliques on teenagers; one obscenity, nine light profanities, and one character says the letters M G; light comical violence such as student trips and starts a food fight and girl falls into her birthday cake; no sex but some teenage romance and romantic rivalry; no nudity, but teenage girls wears bikini in pool, light female cleavage during a couple musical numbers and cheerleaders wear short skirts; no alcohol; no smoking; and, blackmail rebuked and jealousy.

Summary:

In BRATZ, the four Bratz girls must stick together in order to stop an obnoxious teenager from dividing all the students at their high school into separate cliques. BRATZ is a well-plotted comedy with some moral lessons, but it is often corny and is not appropriate for children under 12.

Review:

The most offensive thing about BRATZ, the movie based on the famous line of girl dolls, may be its title. After all, what child would want to be called a Brat?

The story opens with the four Bratz girls, Yasmin, Cloe, Jade, and Sasha, starting high school. The school’s social order is run by the principal’s daughter, Meredith, an obnoxious teenager who wants to make sure that all the students keep only in their own cliques. Two years later, Jade, Sasha, Cloe, and Yasmin find themselves drifting apart because of their own separate interests. For example, Cloe is active in the girls soccer team but Sasha is involved with the cheerleading squad.

When Meredith exacerbates the girls’ differences, the girls decide to break up all the cliques in the school. Everything comes to a head in the school’s talent show, where Meredith tries to assert her dictatorial scheming ways.

BRATZ is a well-plotted, sometimes funny movie for young teenagers and older children on the near side of the teenage divide. There are, however, many corny jokes and corny situations. Also, the story loses a little steam at the end.

That said, BRATZ stays away from being sleazy and placing teenagers in skimpy outfits with midriffs always showing. There are shots, however, where one girl wears a bikini at her pool with her two friends, a couple musical numbers with some female cleavage, and cheerleaders in short cheerleading skirts. Even so, these scenes are not done in a really salacious way. BRATZ also contains some light profanities, and one character says the “d” word at one point.

BRATZ promotes some moral values, such as establishing strong friendships, standing up to bullies and avoiding high school cliques. These positive themes are laced with Romantic elements of following your heart with no reference on basing that in God’s will for your life or biblical truth.

Thus, MOVIEGUIDE® advises a light caution for older children, especially those 11 and under. If BRATZ had been more like NANCY DREW, it would have been a better movie. Still, there are certainly worse movies out there for teenagers.

In Brief:

BRATZ is based on the famous line of dolls. The movie opens with the four Bratz girls, Yasmin, Cloe, Jade, and Sasha, starting high school. The school’s social order is ruled by the principal’s daughter, Meredith, an obnoxious, overbearing teenager who wants to make sure that all the students stay only in their own cliques. Two years later, Jade, Sasha, Cloe, and Yasmin find themselves drifting apart because of their own separate interests. When Meredith exacerbates the girls’ differences, the girls decide to end her reign. At the talent show, where Meredith tries to assert her authority.

BRATZ is a well-plotted, sometimes funny movie for young teenagers and older children. There are, however, many corny jokes and corny situations. Also, the story loses a little steam at the end. BRATZ promotes some moral values, such as establishing strong friendships, standing up to bullies and avoiding high school cliques. These positive themes are laced with Romantic elements with no reference to God. BRATZ also contains some light profanities, and one character says the “d” word in one scene. Thus, MOVIEGUIDE® advises a light caution for older children, especially those 11 and under.