CLIFFORD'S REALLY BIG MOVIE Add To My Top 10

Animal Antics

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Release Date: April 23, 2004

Starring: John Ritter, Cree Summer, Kel Mitchell, Judge Reinhold, Wayne Brady, and John Goodman

Genre: Animated/Comedy

Audience: Young children

Rating: G

Runtime: 73 minutes

Address Comments To:

Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Warner Bros., Inc.
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(BB, C, Acap, V, M) Moral biblical worldview with redemptive element; anti-capitalist element in that villains are a rich businessman and his spoiled daughter, but they repent at the end in a way that reflects a biblical attitude toward business and wealth; lots of light slapstick violence in animal act where animals and people are conked on the head and almost fall and security guards chase animals, resulting in some pratfalls on and off-screen; no sex; no violence; no alcohol, no smoking; and, stealing and cheating rebuked.

GENRE: Animated/Comedy

Summary:

CLIFFORD’S REALLY BIG MOVIE brings TV’s CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG to the big screen in a story where Clifford, a giant Irish setter, joins a crazy animal act so that Clifford can win a lifetime supply of Tummy Yummies and ease his family’s financial burden of feeding him. CLIFFORD’S REALLY BIG MOVIE is a good, clean, moral outing for preschool children and first graders.

Review:

PBS and Scholastic Books take their CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG cartoon series and books, starring the voice of the late John Ritter, to the big screen in CLIFFORD’S REALLY BIG MOVIE. The movie captures the sweetly silly antics of Clifford, a giant Irish setter, and his goofy canine friends, Cleo, a fancy poodle, and T-Bone, an eager bulldog.

Clifford lives with Emily Elizabeth and her family on an island. As the movie opens, Clifford and his friends catch an amazing animal act at a carnival. Run by an amiable chap named Larry (voiced by Judge Reinhold), the act includes a Chihuahua lifting weights, a dachshund on rocket skates, a diving ferret, and a tightrope-walking cow afraid of heights. The act is always a disaster, losing money. The ferret decides that Clifford would help the act win the annual Tummy Yummies Pet Foods talent contest, supplying a lifetime supply of Tummy Yummies. Clifford is flattered, but he doesn’t want to leave Emily Elizabeth.

The next day, however, Clifford overhears the neighbor tell Elizabeth’s parents that it must be difficult feeding a giant dog like Clifford. Clifford decides to leave home and take the animals up on their offer, so that his family won’t have to pay so much money to feed him. He and his friends set off across the bay to the mainland to search for the carnival. Clifford makes the act a success, but the ferret gets jealous and causes trouble.

CLIFFORD’S REALLY BIG MOVIE is a good, clean outing for preschool children and first graders. Cleo, T-Bone, and the other crazy animals will even make adults laugh. The ending could be a little bit more imaginative, however.

Clifford’s big screen antics portray a strong moral worldview, with redemptive elements. There is an anti-capitalist element, in that the villains turn out to be the rich owner of Tummy Yummies and his spoiled daughter, but they both repent in a way that doesn’t attack the moral and biblical legitimacy of capitalism. In the Bible, God ordains that people work to earn a living, own businesses, and accumulate wealth, but He also tells us, “Man does not live on bread alone.” Thus, in a way, CLIFFORD’S REALLY BIG MOVIE reflects a biblical attitude toward business and wealth. The movie also has some slapstick violence, but it isn’t as strong as some of the Looney Tunes and Tom & Jerry cartoons.

In Brief:

CLIFFORD’S REALLY BIG MOVIE brings TV’s CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG to the big screen. Clifford is a giant Irish setter who lives with Emily Elizabeth and her family on an island. In the movie, Clifford and his goofy friends, Cleo the poodle and T-Bone the bulldog, decide to join a crazy animal act so that Clifford can win a lifetime supply of Tummy Yummies and ease his family’s financial burden of feeding him. Clifford makes the animal act a success, but Shackleford the stupendous diving ferret gets jealous and causes trouble.

CLIFFORD’S REALLY BIG MOVIE is a good, clean outing for preschool children and first graders. Cleo, T-Bone, and the other crazy animals will even make adults laugh. Clifford’s big screen antics portray a strong moral worldview, with redemptive elements. There is an anti-capitalist element, in that the villains turn out to be the rich owner of Tummy Yummies and his spoiled daughter, but they both repent in a way that doesn’t attack the moral and biblical legitimacy of capitalism. The movie also has some slapstick violence, but it isn’t as strong as some of the Looney Tunes and Tom & Jerry cartoons.