FEAST OF LOVE

Too Somber, Explicit and Confused

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 14, 2007

Starring: Greg Kinnear, Morgan Freeman,
Radha Mitchell, Jane
Alexander, Alexa Davalos, Toby
Hemingway, Selma Blair, and
Billy Burke

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 102 minutes

Distributor: MGM

Director: Robert Benton

Executive Producer: David Scott Rubin, Eric Reid,
Harley Tannebaum, Lori
McCreary, Fisher Stevens, and
John Penotti

Producer: Tom Rosenberg, Gary Lucchesi
and Richard S. Wright

Writer: Allison Burnett

Address Comments To:

Harry E. Sloan, Chairman/CEO
Clark Woods, President of Domestic Theatrical Distribution
MGM Studios Inc.
(Partially owned by Sony Corporation of America)
10250 Constellation Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 900067
Phone: (310) 449-3000
Fax: (310) 449-8819
Website: www.mgm.com

Content:

(PaPa, RoRo, OO, HoHo, B, H, Cap, LLL, V, SSS, NNN, AA, DD, MM) Strong mixed pagan worldview sends mixed messages with strong elements of hedonistic paganism, Romanticism, occultism (including references to astrology, psychic readings, palm readings, and Tarot cards), and homosexuality that overshadow some positive, morally uplifting elements, including a man defends God when another man has strong doubts about the benevolence of God in the wake of two terrible tragedies, plus some more or less trite humanist psychobabble and light pro-capitalist implications; about 23 obscenities (mostly “f” words), six strong profanities and five light profanities; some light football violence, heart attack scene, older man threatens young woman with knife, man stabs milk carton in paper sack woman is carrying, brief fight between two older men, and implied shots of man deliberately cutting off tip of one finger because, he says, he wanted to feel as much physical pain as emotional pain in the wake of romance problems with two failed marriages; very strong sexual content includes depicted pre-marital sex, depicted adulterous sex, depicted lesbian sex, two women kiss, etc.; full female nudity in at least one scene and shots of upper and rear female nudity and upper and rear male nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness in minor character; smoking and references to one young man’s recent recovery from past drug use and an overdose with another man’s past drug use; and, cheating, divorce, man relates a parable about the gods inventing love then laughter, man whose wife abandons him has to buy back dog from mercenary nephew, woman mentions New Age concept of “harmonic convergence,” man implies we should just accept who people fall into love with even if one of the people is married or of the same sex, and man tells girlfriend his mother abandoned family, which turned his father into a drunk.

Summary:

FEAST OF LOVE is an often somber romantic drama about the love affairs and marriages of a coffee shop owner and his three wives, a faithful elderly professor and his wife, and a young working class couple who dream of a large house and a large family. FEAST OF LOVE is mostly a somber journey about the bad things that can happen to relationships and families, with explicit sex and nudity and a mixed worldview with occult references and pleas for compassion, large families and happy marriages with the right person.

Review:

FEAST OF LOVE sounds like it would be a jaunty comedy about different kinds of love, but it’s mostly a somber journey about all the bad things that can come when flawed people love other people.

Greg Kinnear plays Bradley, a die-hard romantic who owns a local coffee shop in Portland, Oregon. He is friends with Harry, a local professor and writer played by Morgan Freeman. Harry notices one day that Bradley’s wife Kathryn (Selma Blair) is enamored with an athletic lesbian who clearly wants to break up their marriage. Kathryn leaves Bradley, who eventually becomes attracted to Diana (Radha Mitchell), an edgy real estate agent having an affair with one of her married clients (Billy Burke). Harry tries to help Bradley navigate his way through this maze of relationship confusion.

While Bradley has his troubles with romantic love, the movie shows Harry’s wife Esther (Jane Alexander) trying to help Harry cope with the untimely death of their son. Meanwhile, Bradley’s young employee, Oscar (Toby Hemingway), begins an affair with pretty Chloe (Alexa Davalos). Chloe embraces marriage with Oscar, even though he is a recovering drug addict and even though a psychic strongly suggests that death is stalking her future husband.

The mixture of all these relationships comes to a head when coincidence and destiny intervene.

There’s not much life in this melancholy movie. The tone, acting and music are more gloomy and pensive than happy and actively engaging. FEAST OF LOVE also contains explicit sex and nudity.

Some of the movie’s sentiments are trite, especially one message suggesting that the best we can do in the face of loss or tragedy is just to begin again. At one point Harry doubts the benevolence of God, but Bradley defends God. Other than that, there is no religious content in FEAST OF LOVE, unless you count the movie’s support for occult practices like astrology, palm reading, fortune telling, and Tarot cards. The movie does, however, contain some positive compassionate moments. It also lifts up the ideas of having children, family and finding the right person to marry. Thus, the movie’s worldview is somewhat mixed, but mostly favors a pagan philosophy with occult mysticism about life and love, and a vague concept of God without reference to biblical revelation.

As MOVIEGUIDE® and other scholars have written about often, the evidence in nature (including human nature) and in world history shows that a personal God exists. And, since we are personal beings made in God’s image, then it seems logical that God is able to communicate to us and through us. That’s exactly what the Bible tells us, so there really is no need to look beyond the Bible for the truth about God and His message to human beings. Therefore, if you really want to know the truth about life, love, God, and Jesus Christ, it’s best to look there first and foremost rather than consult occult psychics, kindly professors, coffee shop owners, or the stars.

In Brief:

In FEAST OF LOVE, Greg Kinnear plays Bradley, a die-hard romantic who owns a coffee shop in Portland, Oregon. Bradley’s wife leaves him for another woman. Bradley’s young employee, Oscar, begins an affair with pretty Chloe. Chloe embraces marriage with Oscar, even though a psychic tells her that death is stalking her future husband. Eventually, Bradley becomes attracted to Diana, an edgy real estate agent having an affair with a married client. Bradley’s friend, Harry, a local professor and writer played by Morgan Freeman, tries to help Bradley and Chloe navigate their way through this maze of relationship confusion. At the same time, Harry’s wife, Esther, tries to help Harry, who’s mourning their son’s untimely death.

The title FEAST OF LOVE sounds like it would be a jaunty comedy about different kinds of love, but it’s mostly a somber journey about all the bad things that can come when flawed people love. The tone and the music are more gloomy than happy. FEAST OF LOVE also contains explicit sex and nudity. Finally, the worldview is mixed, with elements of paganism, Romanticism, occultism, compassion, and one positive reference to God.