JHOOM BARABAR JHOOM

Bollywood Gets Down and Dirty

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 15, 2007

Starring: Abhishek Bachchan, Preity
Zinta, Bobby Deol, and Lara
Dutta

Genre: Musical Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: NR

Runtime: 131 minutes

Distributor: Yash Raj Films

Director: Shaad Ali

Executive Producer: d Gets Down and Dirty **

Producer: Aditya Chopra and Yash Chopra

Writer: Habib Faisal

Address Comments To:

Yash Chopra
Yash Raj Films USA Inc.
30-00 47th Avenue, 4th Floor
Long Island City, NY 11101,
Phone: (718) 786 3311
Fax: (718) 786 9890
E-mail: usoffice@yashrajfilms.com

Content:

(PaPa, FRFR, LLL, SS, N, A, M) Strong Hindu pagan worldview with leading character praying in a Hindu church and in several false religious settings; numerous subtitles like “%$@*^!” indicating the use of foul language in a language the reviewer did not understand, 12 subtitled obscenities and three profanities spelled out in English (shocking for a Bollywood production); no violence; strong sexual content includes references to the number of times leading characters have engaged in sex outside of marriage, one major character is a prostitute, and lots of suggestive dancing, sometimes in skimpy outfits; upper male nudity and skimpy outfits; alcohol use; and, rampant dishonesty.

Summary:

JHOOM BARABAR JHOOM is a musical comedy from India about a guy and a girl who meet in a train station and, in order to strike up a non-threatening conversation, both pretend to be engaged. This movie contains foul language and sexual behavior more typical of Hollywood than India’s entertainment capitol, but it also has a strong Hindu worldview.

Review:

JHOOM BARABAR JHOOM (Dance Baby Dance) is a musical comedy from India about a guy who meets a girl in a train station and, in order to strike up a non-threatening conversation, pretends to be engaged. She does likewise. They each tell elaborate dishonest stories about their engagement (acted out complete with typical Bollywood dance sequences). In the process, they fall in love with each other but cannot express their affection because each believes the other’s story.

As with most Bollywood productions, the movie is long, contains an intermission and is loaded with dancing and glamour close-ups. Unlike most of the other Bollywood (India’s version of Hollywood) movies MOVIEGUIDE® has reviewed, however, this one was laced with subtitles like “%$@*^!” indicating foul language. In addition, 12 obscenities and 3 profanities are spelled out in English. The movie also discusses the number of premarital sexual encounters the lead characters have had. One important character in the movie is a foul-mouthed prostitute.

Apparently, someone in India has fallen for the idea that Bollywood needs to follow Hollywood into the pit. It is sad to see Bollywood stoop to Hollywood standards. In fact, this movie goes so far it worships Hollywood. Two of the major song and dance routines in the movie were in celebration of winning a ticket to Hollywood. Clearly, Hollywood is a magnet to people from around the world seeking fame, fortune, glamour, and a chance to engage in cinematic artistic expression. Sadly, that path is strewn with spiritual potholes.

The movie also has a strong Hindu pagan worldview in several abhorrent religious settings. The lead female character in the movie prays in a Hindu church as well as in some false religious shrines. The subtitles refer to “God” but the impression given by the movie is that the word “God” is useful for all religions equally. Of course, this is not the case. There is only one God and He sent His Son, Jesus Christ, to die for the forgiveness of our sins.

In Brief:

JHOOM BARABAR JHOOM is a Bollywood (India’s version of Hollywood) musical comedy. The story is about a guy who meets a girl in a train station and, in order to strike up a non-threatening conversation, pretends to be engaged. She does likewise. They each tell elaborate dishonest stories about their engagement (acted out with typical Bollywood dance sequences). In the process, they fall in love with each other but cannot express their affection because each believes the other’s story.

As with most Bollywood productions, the movie is long, contains an intermission and is loaded with dancing and glamour close-ups. Unlike the other Bollywood movies, this one is laced with subtitled symbols indicating foul language. In addition, 12 obscenities and 3 profanities are spelled out in English. The movie also discusses the number of premarital sexual encounters the lead characters have had. One important character in the movie is a foul-mouthed prostitute. Apparently, someone in India has fallen for the idea that Bollywood needs to follow Hollywood into the pit. Sadly, that path is strewn with spiritual potholes. The movie also has a strong Hindu pagan worldview in several abhorrent religious settings.