MARGOT AT THE WEDDING Add To My Top 10

Excessive Dysfunctionality

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 16, 2007

Starring: Nicole Kidman, Jack Black, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Zane Pais, John Turturro, Ciarán Hinds, and Flora Cross

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Vantage

Director: Noah Baumbach

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Scott Rudin

Writer: Noah Baumbach

Address Comments To:

Sumner Redstone, Chairman/CEO, Viacom
John Lesher, President, Paramount Vantage (aka Paramount Classics)
A Division of Paramount Pictures
5555 Melrose Avenue
Chevalier Building
Los Angeles, CA 90038
Phone: (323) 956-2000
Fax: (323) 862-1212
Website: www.paramountclassics.com

Content:

(H, PaPa, B, Ho, LLL, V, SS, NN, A, D, M) Light implied humanist worldview with strong immoral pagan behavior and light implied pro-family content, plus two minor characters are male homosexual partners and crude mention is made of homosexual sex; about 60 mostly strong obscenities (including many “f” words and two or three obscene references to homosexual sex), eight strong profanities and two light profanities; brief comic violence includes tree falls on a temporary edifice and woman grabs child from being harmed, and older teenager menaces younger ones; strong sexual content includes depicted self-abuse, sexual talk, implied adultery, implied fornication or pre-marital sex, man admits to making advances on older teenage babysitter, and woman is pregnant before getting married; brief upper female nudity, brief rear male nudity and brief upper male nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, lying, gossip and woman sometimes says mean things to people, even to her own son.

Summary:

MARGOT AT THE WEDDING stars Nicole Kidman, Jack Black and Jennifer Jason Leigh in a story about a dysfunctional, razor-tongued, pseudo-intellectual writer and her unassuming, free-spirited sister. MARGOT AT THE WEDDING is a well-acted, often funny movie about a quirky dysfunctional family, but its humanist worldview contains too much unacceptable foul language and sexual content without consequences.

Review:

MARGOT AT THE WEDDING is a well-acted, often funny movie about a quirky dysfunctional family.

Nicole Kidman stars as Margot Zeller, a razor-tongued, pseudo-intellectual writer estranged from her unassuming sister, Pauline. Margot sets off with her teenage son, Claude, to attend Pauline’s small wedding at the family home their deceased mother gave Pauline. As soon as Margot meets Malcolm, Pauline’s unemployed fiancé, she plants seeds of doubt about the planned nuptials. Other complications ensue, including Margot’s own marital troubles. In the midst of these complications, Margot and Pauline eventually must rely on one another for emotional support. Margot also must realize that her marital woes, and acid tongue, should not drive a wedge between her and her son, Claude.

By the end of this movie, Margot re-connects with her sister and her son, but she does so without God’s help and without any objective moral standards, much less biblical ones. In fact, all of the characters in the story are pretty much of a mess, but the acting and the humor in the piece help bring the story and characters to life. The movie contains too much unacceptable foul language and sexual content without consequences, however.

Also, the quirky quality of the story and the characters probably will not appeal to a broad audience, so MARGOT AND THE WEDDING is likely to have trouble finding a following. Jack Black creates a funny character in Malcolm, however. This may help attract some viewers. There is some funny, interesting chemistry going on between him, Nicole Kidman and Jennifer Jason Leigh, who plays Pauline. Also, Zane Pais creates a sympathetic character in Margot’s son, Claude. The foul language piles up rather high, however, especially for such a short movie. Without a proper spiritual and moral vision, people will perish.

In Brief:

MARGOT AT THE WEDDING stars Nicole Kidman as Margo Zeller, a razor-tongued, pseudo-intellectual writer estranged from her unassuming sister, Pauline. Margot sets off with her teenage son, Claude, to attend Pauline’s small wedding at the family home their mother gave Pauline. As soon as Margot meets Malcolm, Pauline’s unemployed fiancé, she plants seeds of doubt about the planned nuptials. Other complications intervene, including Margot’s own marital troubles. In the midst of these complications, Margot and Pauline must rely on one another for emotional support. Margot also must realize that her marital woes, and acid tongue, hurts her son, Claude.

MARGOT AT THE WEDDING is a well-acted, often funny movie about a quirky dysfunctional family. There is some funny, interesting chemistry going on between Nicole Kidman and Jennifer Jason Leigh, who plays Pauline, and Jack Black, who plays Malcolm. Also, Zane Pais creates a sympathetic character in Margot’s son, Claude. Margot reconnects and bonds with her sister and her son, but she does so without God and without any objective moral standards. The movie contains too much unacceptable foul language and sexual content without consequences. Without a spiritual vision, people will perish.