MR. BEAN'S HOLIDAY

One-Man Disaster Area

Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 24, 2007

Starring: Rowan Atkinson, Max Baldry,
Emma De Caunes, Willem Dafoe,
Karel Roden, and Jean
Rochefort

Genre: Comedy

Audience: All ages

Rating: G

Runtime: 87 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures/Viacom

Director: Steve Bendelack

Executive Producer: Richard Curtis and Simon
McBurney

Producer: Peter Bennett-Jones, Tim Bevan
and Eric Fellner

Writer: Hamish McColl and Robin
Driscoll

Address Comments To:

Jeff Zucker, President/CEO
NBC Universal Entertainment
(A division of General Electric)
Ron Meyer, President/COO
Universal Studios
Marc Shmuger, Chairman
David Linde, Co-Chairman
Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(Ro, B, Pa, C, V, N, MM) Light Romantic worldview with some mixed moral and pagan elements since main character is often self-absorbed and careless of others, so he’s more of a comic foil than a positive role model, plus Anglican vicar holds church raffle with donated prizes; no foul language; some comic violence, such as slapping, tank rolls over bicycle, sudden explosion in village during what turns out to be the shooting of a movie, man jumps off bridge, implied smashing of small wooden building by speeding truck, and some pratfalls; no sex scenes, but woman kisses man’s cheek; people in swimsuits on the beach, but nothing salacious and no sexual nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, stealing, carelessness, self-absorption, and man in fancy restaurant dumps uneaten oysters into woman’s open purse.

Summary:

MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY stars Rowan Atkinson in the title role in a G-rated pastiche of many sight gags where Mr. Bean has to safely return a stranded boy to his father, who’s attending the Cannes Film Festival. The hilarious ending and some of Mr. Atkinson’s more inspired comic bits make up for the story’s slower parts, but Mr. Bean sometimes acts like a naughty, self-absorbed child, so MOVIEGUIDE® advises caution for younger children.

Review:

Rowan Atkinson once again plays the title role in MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY, a G-rated pastiche of many sight gags centered on the self-absorbed, careless Mr. Bean.

The movie opens with Mr. Bean winning the first prize in a church raffle, a free trip to the beaches at Cannes, France. Mr. Bean excitedly videotapes his every moment. At the railway station in Paris, he convinces a man to tape him at the door of the train. Mr. Bean makes the train but the man does not, and Mr. Bean stands helpless at the closed door, which he can’t figure out how to open. Then, Mr. Bean realizes that the man’s son is left on the train. The man yells to his panicked son to wait for him at the next stop.

At the next station, however, the next train does not stop, so the boy’s father holds up a sign with his cell phone number in the window. Luckily, Mr. Bean has taped the event but he and the boy discover that the father had his fingers over the last two numbers. They decide to go through all the possible combinations, but in the process of doing that, Mr. Bean leaves behind their passports and train tickets.

Mr. Bean and the boy start hitching their way across France to Cannes, but comic disaster stalks them at every turn. A camera at the second train station leads the father and the police to believe that Mr. Bean has kidnapped the boy. Everything comes to a head in a hilarious, joyful sequence at the Cannes Film Festival, where Mr. Bean almost ruins the premiere of a director’s new movie.

The ending and some of Mr. Atkinson’s more inspired comic bits make up for some pacing problems in the middle of MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY. One of the funniest bits is a pantomime of a tragic opera song performed by Mr. Bean and the boy. A main drawback is that Mr. Bean steals a couple items in the story, including a bicycle and a small motorized bike, and deliberately dumps a plate of uneaten oysters into a woman’s purse. Offsetting these moral lapses in his character is his concern that the boy get back safely with his father.

At the end of the movie, misunderstandings are cleared up and Mr. Bean sings about the joys of France and the French Riviera with the other cast members.

MOVIEGUIDE® gives a caution to MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY for younger children because Mr. Bean sometimes acts like a naughty child.

In Brief:

MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY stars Rowan Atkinson in the title role in a G-rated pastiche of sight gags. Mr. Bean wins a church raffle, a trip to Cannes on the French Riviera. A comical encounter with a man traveling with his son leads to the son and Mr. Bean being stranded. They try to hitch their way to Cannes while trying to phone the father’s cell phone, but they have to guess the last two numbers of the phone number. A series of misadventures leads to a hilarious, joyful sequence at the Cannes Film Festival.

The ending and some of Mr. Atkinson’s more inspired comic bits make up for some pacing problems in the middle of MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY. A main drawback is that Mr. Bean steals a couple items in the story, including a bicycle and a motorized bike, and deliberately dumps a plate of uneaten oysters into a woman’s purse. Offsetting the moral lapses in his character is his concern that the boy get back safely with his father. MOVIEGUIDE® gives a caution to MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY for younger children because Mr. Bean sometimes acts like a naughty, self-absorbed child.