PARIS JE T'AIME

Corruption in the City of Love

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 06, 2007

Starring: Marianne Faithfull, Elias
McConnell, Steve Buscemi,
Barbet Schroeder, Miranda
Richardson, Juliette Binoche,
Willem Dafoe, Nick Nolte,
Maggie Gyllenhaal, Bob
Hoskins, Elijah Wood, Rufus
Sewell, Natalie Portman,
Gérard Depardieu, Ben
Gazzara, and Gena Rowlands

Genre: Romance

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: First Look Pictures

Director: Olivier Assayas, Frédéric
Auburtin, Emmanuel Benbihy,
Gurinder Chadha, Sylvain
Chomet, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen,
Isabel Coixet, Wes Craven,
Alfonso Cuarón, Gérard
Depardieu, Christopher Doyle,
Richard LaGravenese, Vincenzo
Natali, Alexander Payne, Bruno
Podalydès, Walter Salles,
Oliver Schmitz, Nobuhiro Suwa,
Daniela Thomas, Tom Tykwer,
and Gus Van Sant

Executive Producer: Chris Bolzli, Gilles Caussade,
Rafi Chaudry, Sam Englebardt,
Henri Jacob, Ara Katz, Maria
Köpf, Frank Moss, and Chad
Troutwine

Producer: Emmanuel Benbihy and Claudie
Ossard

Writer: Tristan Carné, Emmanuel
Benbihy, et al.

Address Comments To:

Chris Cooney, CEO/Chairman
Ruth Vitale, President
First Look Pictures
A division of Overseas Filmgroup
8800 Sunset Blvd., East PH
Los Angeles, CA 90046
Phone: (323) 337-1000
Fax: (323) 337-1037
Website: www.flp.com
Email: info@firstlookmedia.com

Content:

(HH, R, B, C, HoHo, O, LLL, VVV, SS, N, A, DD, M) Strong humanist elements overall which place emphasis on the material world, a world without God, but each segment has its own worldview, thus the movie as a whole has elements of Romanticism as well as some moral and Christian overtones plus some depicted homosexual content; 44 obscenities and profanities and man talks about his faith in occult mystics and aura; some very strong violence includes man beats up an innocent tourist, female vampire bites man’s neck and drinks his blood, man cuts wrist open with broken bottle and vampire drinks his blood, man falls down stairs and breaks his neck, blood streams from his neck into a heart shape, vampire bites her own wrist and man drinks her blood, and man and woman bite each other’s necks to show affection; group of boys talk about having sex with girls that walk by, implied homosexual male relationship though nothing explicit, two women kiss, mention of a woman who was raped then married her rapist but nothing shown, and stripper; stripper begins to strip but is stopped before anything is shown and light naturalistic nudity though nothing explicit; consumption of alcohol in a social environment, but no explicit drunkenness; cigarette smoking and dealing and smoking marijuana; and, man wants to leave his wife for a younger woman but decides against it when his wife has a fatal illness, mention of God making us suffer and that no goodness is left on Earth but in another segment a woman declares she gets her strength from God, and drug dealer steals watch.

Summary:

PARIS JE T’AIME is a movie that consists of 20 separate love stories in the famed City of Love, all filmed by different directors in different styles. Some of the segments are great while others are not, but the overall product has a considerable amount of questionable content, including alcohol and illegal drug use, foul language, some sexual content, and blood and violence.

Review:

PARIS JE T’AIME is a unique feature that is comprised entirely of 20 short segments with one central theme: Love in Paris. Translated “Paris, I Love You,” the movie tells 20 varying stories reflecting concepts like romance, divorce, faithfulness/commitment, sexual passion, innocent attraction, and death. Each movie has a different director(s), and each tells its plotline in a different style according to that director’s vision.

As one might imagine, some of the segments are better than others. This can work for or against the movie. If you don’t like a certain segment, you’re in luck because each short lasts about eight minutes, only to be replaced by another. However, a number of the shorts are intriguing. Thus, viewers will want to know more about these characters and their story, but after eight minutes, they don’t get to revisit the characters again, except for a very brief bridging montage showing several of the segments’ characters walking the streets of Paris.

Not knowing much about the film beforehand, one would think that all the stories would be connected, or at least that the movie would revisit some of the characters again. By the “end” of many of the shorts, however, too much is left open and the stories are merely being introduced rather than really concluded. Incorporating a traditional three-act structure into eight minutes is incredibly difficult, so it is unreasonable to expect the directors to do so every time. However, there should have been some sort of resolution to each story, or at the very least, a well-incorporated “cliffhanger”-type ending.

Because these segments have no cohesive, underlying connection, the movie seems tedious. Consequently, the audience must reorient themselves in an entirely new segment 20 times in two hours.

While some segments may be appropriate for families, parents should not let their children near this movie, as some segments have vulgar language, implied sex, drug and alcohol use, and/or blood and violence. Because these segments are all screened together as one feature, the inappropriate segments are unavoidable. In addition, each segment expresses a different worldview (those that are both positive and negative) that many children may find difficult to understand. The movie has a predominantly humanist worldview, but there are some Romantic, moral, and Christian elements as well.

In concept, this movie sounds like a winner. Many of the segments were excellent, but just as many were not. The half that are great are brought down by the half that are not, measuring out to a pallid movie that is only worth your time if you have the patience. Even then, you might find yourself constantly checking the clock.

In Brief:

PARIS JE T’AIME is a unique feature that is comprised entirely of 20 short segments with one central theme: Love in Paris. Translated “Paris, I Love You,” the movie tells 20 stories that reflect concepts like romance, divorce, faithfulness/commitment, sexual passion, innocent attraction, and death. Each movie has a different director(s), and each tells its plotline in a different style according to that director’s vision.

PARIS JE T’AIME is an interesting, albeit sometimes tedious, movie that has little to no payoff in the end. The shorts seem to be more of a kickoff to a greater story but never get there in the end. While some segments may be appropriate for families, parents should not let their children near this movie, as some segments have foul language, brief sexual content, drug and alcohol use, and/or blood and violence. Because these segments are all screened together as one feature, the inappropriate segments are unavoidable. In addition, each segment expresses a different worldview (both positive and negative) that many children may find difficult to understand. The movie has a predominantly humanist worldview but has some Romantic, moral, and Christian elements as well.