THE BLUE KITE

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Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Lu Liping, Yi Tian, Zhang
Wenyau, Chen Xiaoman, Pu
Quanxin, Li Xuejian, & Guo
Baocheng

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: NR (not rated)

Runtime: 138 Minutes

Distributor: Kino International

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Xiao Mao

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Content:

(Ac, LL, V, A, FR, M) Anti-Communist worldview; 11 obscenities & 1 profanity; 1 non-gratuitous violent act by main character & 1 non-graphic beating; beer and wine routinely served at meals, but not abused; grandmother briefly seen lighting incense and praying to goddess of mercy for healing of main character; 1 reference to a wedding date as being "lucky" for prosperity & success; and, smoking by two adolescents & adolescents vandalize school by throwing bricks through windows in act of rebellion.

Summary:

THE BLUE KITE is an unblinking chronicle of life under the mandates of the communist Chinese government, starting with the Rectification Movement in the 1950's and ending as the Cultural Revolution explodes in 1968. The story is told by Tietou, a strong-willed boy who is a life-long victim of family tragedies resulting from repeated government manipulation. The production quality of the film is first rate, but THE BLUE KITE contains objectionable elements that make it unsuitable for children.

Review:

THE BLUE KITE is an unblinking chronicle of life under the mandates of the communist Chinese government, starting from the Rectification Movement of the mid-1950's to the Cultural Revolution in 1968. This story of everyday life in China is told through the eyes of a strong-willed boy named Tietou who experiences a string of family tragedies resulting from the government's changing policies. The film, which has been banned and labeled as a threat by China's current regime, is quite effective at pointing out the shortcomings of a juggernaut governmental system which fails repeatedly at serving its citizens. However, the film-makers fail to illustrate any substantial hope for redemption.

The production quality of the film is first rate. The script is clear and strong. The touch of the director is sure and unpretentious. The performances are all noteworthy, especially lead actress Lu Liping as Tietou's mother, the long-suffering Shujan. The three juvenile actors who portray the imperious but adorable Tietou as a toddler, a small boy and a young adolescent are each talented beyond their years as actors of emotional depth and humorous charm.

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