THE RUNDOWN Add To My Top 10

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 26, 2003

Starring: Dwayne Johnson, Seann William Scott, Rosario Dawson, Christopher Walken, Ewen Bremmer, Jon Gries, William Lucking, and Ernie Reyes, Jr.

Genre: Action-Adventure

Audience: Older teenagers and
adults REVIEWER: Lisa A.
Rice Mr. Beck ("The Rock,"
a.k.a Dwayne Johnson) is a
highly paid retriever of
important missing items like
jewelry, weapons, and people.
What he really wants is to
open his own restaurant, but
because he is in big debt, he
accepts the occasional bounty
hunter job. His
self-proclaimed "final job" is
to find a mob boss's son,
Travis Walker, a Stanford
dropout apparently living
somewhere in the Amazon. If
Beck brings the lad home,
he'll get $250,000, enough to
get out of the business
forever and start his
restaurant. He hires a small
plane with wings duct taped
together by its pilot, Declan,
who spouts off Scripture with
a Scottish accent while flying
into the beautiful Amazon
jungle. Declan also warns Beck
to stay away from the local
rebels who hide out in the
jungle and are known to be
cruel. Meanwhile, in a small
tavern along the Amazon, the
elusive Travis Walker is
asking the beautiful
bartender, Mariana, if he can
borrow her uncle's boat. He
confesses to knowing where the
"Gato de Diablo," or "Devil
Cat" gold artifact is hidden.
Mariana believes him and
agrees to the loan on the
condition that Walker consent
to a 50/50 split of the
proceeds. Finding his way
into the same town, El Dorado,
Beck discovers the ruthless,
greedy Hatcher, played by
Christopher Walken, who has
"hired" all the townsfolk to
mine a quarry for precious
metals at the rate of sixty
cents a day. Hatcher's
henchmen have leather whips,
which they use without
hesitation if they don't like
the attitude of a townsperson
protesting being shorted on a
deal. Beck comments that it
looks like a living hell, to
which Hatcher replies that
what hell is to one person may
actually be a "spellbinding
sense of purpose" to another
person. He brags about his
methods of employing the
people while enormous income
for himself. He negotiates the
release of Walker from his
employment for the sum of
$15,000. Beck pays the money
and goes to the bar to
retrieve the boy. After a
tough scuffle, Walker is
captured. Just as they are
leaving, Hatcher shows up at
the bar refusing Walker's
release on account of the
"Gato de Diablo." Hatcher
demands to be taken to it, but
in the ensuing scuffle, Beck
takes down the henchmen and
escapes with Walker. As they
drive away, Walker suddenly
screams, "Enjoy the fall!"
grabs the wheel, and sends the
jeep barreling down the side
of a mountain. The men jump
out and roll down the hill
where they find themselves in
the midst of a band of rebels.
Speaking broken Spanish,
Walker tells them that Beck
works for Hatcher, is not to
be trusted, and really wants
to fight them. Fight he does!
Beck takes on six good rebel
fighters and ends up with
their undying respect. Just
then Mariana shows up. Walker
is shocked that she is also a
rebel fighter and admits to
also wanting the "Gato" to
sell for the rebuilding of the
townspeople's lives. After a
surprise attack by Hatcher and
his men, Beck, Walker, and
Mariana decide to team up and
find the treasure, while
trying also to evade the
vicious Hatcher and his
whip-laden henchmen. Beck vows
to take Walker back home
afterwards, but Beck has plans
of his own as does Mariana.
The future of the beaten-down
El Dorado townsfolk, as well
that of Beck's restaurant,
hinge upon whether or not the
threesome can form a
trustworthy team. With
outstanding action sequences,
cinematography, timing, humor,
and suspense, RUNDOWN should
see some serious box office
activity this fall. For moral
audiences, however, there are
some issues to consider. The
foul language is excessive
with about 33 obscenities and
some obscene gestures. There
is also excessive violence,
with men being shot to death,
gunned down, multiple fist
fights, a head being knocked
off, and bulls charging
townspeople. As far as sexual
content is concerned, there is
a running joke about jungle
monkeys that keep trying to
"make advances" on the
protagonist as he's caught in
a trap, and there are several
scenes where the shapely
Mariana is sporting a wet
T-shirt as she swims in the
jungle streams. The
Scripture-spouting pilot is a
bit off in the head, it seems,
and is also unwilling to help
with the fighting. He finally
helps, in his own way, by
playing the bagpipes to divert
the bad guy's attention away
from our hero. Overall, the
movie is a high-dollar,
white-knuckled action film
with sporadic moments of
breathtaking beauty and
laughter. The writing is good,
and the comedic scenes are
tight. The movie's tone is
humanist, with the strength of
man and the power of his
weapons being the
all-important answer to the
social ills of third world
countries. In addition to
quotes from Scripture,
however, there are several
other positive Christian
elements in the movie. These
include a God bless you, and,
most importantly, prominent
shots of the local Christian
church when the good guys
subdue the villain. As with
many action films, however,
there is no overt preaching to
the story. . . just lots of
non-stop adventure in exotic
locations. Please address your
comments to: Stacey Snider,
Chairman Universal
Pictures Ron Meyer,
President/COO Universal
Studios 100 Universal City
Plaza Universal City, CA
91608-1085 Phone: (818)
777-1000 Web Page:
www.universalstudios.com

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 105 minutes

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, B, C, LLL, VVV, S, A, DD, M) Humanist, heroic worldview with strength, weaponry, and the current reasoning of man being the end all to end all, with some positive moral, Christian elements including self-sacrifice, shots of the town church when the good guys are victorious, man says God bless you, and man quotes Scripture; 33 obscenities and a couple obscene gestures; violence, fist fights, gunfights, man shot to death, man's head blown off, and bulls stampeding townsfolk; sex, crude humor about sexually aggressive monkeys, and wet T-shirt depictions; some alcohol portrayed in jungle bar; drug use portrayed with girl tricking friends with jungle fruit that causes hallucinations; and, lying, cheating, murder, and slavery.

GENRE: Action-Adventure

H

B

C

LLL

A

DD

M

S

VVV

Summary:

In RUNDOWN, The Rock attempts to square a debt by heading to the Amazon jungle to capture a kid, but instead finds himself also dealing with a tyrant, a love interest and some powerful freedom fighters. With incredible cinematography, writing and acting, RUNDOWN is marred by the violence, humanism, and foul language typical of high-action films.

Review:

Mr. Beck ("The Rock," a.k.a Dwayne Johnson) is a highly paid retriever of important missing items like jewelry, weapons, and people. What he really wants is to open his own restaurant, but because he is in big debt, he accepts the occasional bounty hunter job. His self-proclaimed "final job" is to find a mob boss's son, Travis Walker, a Stanford dropout apparently living somewhere in the Amazon. If Beck brings the lad home, he'll get $250,000, enough to get out of the business forever and start his restaurant. He hires a small plane with wings duct taped together by its pilot, Declan, who spouts off Scripture with a Scottish accent while flying into the beautiful Amazon jungle. Declan also warns Beck to stay away from the local rebels who hide out in the jungle and are known to be cruel.

Meanwhile, in a small tavern along the Amazon, the elusive Travis Walker is asking the beautiful bartender, Mariana, if he can borrow her uncle's boat. He confesses to knowing where the "Gato de Diablo," or "Devil Cat" gold artifact is hidden. Mariana believes him and agrees to the loan on the condition that Walker consent to a 50/50 split of the proceeds.

Finding his way into the same town, El Dorado, Beck discovers the ruthless, greedy Hatcher, played by Christopher Walken, who has "hired" all the townsfolk to mine a quarry for precious metals at the rate of sixty cents a day. Hatcher's henchmen have leather whips, which they use without hesitation if they don't like the attitude of a townsperson protesting being shorted on a deal. Beck comments that it looks like a living hell, to which Hatcher replies that what hell is to one person may actually be a "spellbinding sense of purpose" to another person. He brags about his methods of employing the people while enormous income for himself. He negotiates the release of Walker from his employment for the sum of $15,000.

Beck pays the money and goes to the bar to retrieve the boy. After a tough scuffle, Walker is captured. Just as they are leaving, Hatcher shows up at the bar refusing Walker's release on account of the "Gato de Diablo." Hatcher demands to be taken to it, but in the ensuing scuffle, Beck takes down the henchmen and escapes with Walker.

As they drive away, Walker suddenly screams, "Enjoy the fall!" grabs the wheel, and sends the jeep barreling down the side of a mountain. The men jump out and roll down the hill where they find themselves in the midst of a band of rebels. Speaking broken Spanish, Walker tells them that Beck works for Hatcher, is not to be trusted, and really wants to fight them. Fight he does! Beck takes on six good rebel fighters and ends up with their undying respect. Just then Mariana shows up. Walker is shocked that she is also a rebel fighter and admits to also wanting the "Gato" to sell for the rebuilding of the townspeople's lives.

After a surprise attack by Hatcher and his men, Beck, Walker, and Mariana decide to team up and find the treasure, while trying also to evade the vicious Hatcher and his whip-laden henchmen. Beck vows to take Walker back home afterwards, but Beck has plans of his own as does Mariana. The future of the beaten-down El Dorado townsfolk, as well that of Beck's restaurant, hinge upon whether or not the threesome can form a trustworthy team.

With outstanding action sequences, cinematography, timing, humor, and suspense, RUNDOWN should see some serious box office activity this fall. For moral audiences, however, there are some issues to consider. The foul language is excessive with about 33 obscenities and some obscene gestures. There is also excessive violence, with men being shot to death, gunned down, multiple fist fights, a head being knocked off, and bulls charging townspeople. As far as sexual content is concerned, there is a running joke about jungle monkeys that keep trying to "make advances" on the protagonist as he's caught in a trap, and there are several scenes where the shapely Mariana is sporting a wet T-shirt as she swims in the jungle streams. The Scripture-spouting pilot is a bit off in the head, it seems, and is also unwilling to help with the fighting. He finally helps, in his own way, by playing the bagpipes to divert the bad guy's attention away from our hero.

Overall, the movie is a high-dollar, white-knuckled action film with sporadic moments of breathtaking beauty and laughter. The writing is good, and the comedic scenes are tight. The movie's tone is humanist, with the strength of man and the power of his weapons being the all-important answer to the social ills of third world countries. In addition to quotes from Scripture, however, there are several other positive Christian elements in the movie. These include a God bless you, and, most importantly, prominent shots of the local Christian church when the good guys subdue the villain. As with many action films, however, there is no overt preaching to the story. . . just lots of non-stop adventure in exotic locations.

Please address your comments to:

Stacey Snider, Chairman

Universal Pictures

Ron Meyer, President/COO

Universal Studios

100 Universal City Plaza

Universal City, CA 91608-1085

Phone: (818) 777-1000

Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

SUMMARY: In RUNDOWN, The Rock attempts to square a debt by heading to the Amazon jungle to capture a kid, but instead finds himself also dealing with a tyrant, a love interest and some powerful freedom fighters. With incredible cinematography, writing and acting, RUNDOWN is marred by the violence, humanism, and foul language typical of high-action films.

In Brief: