ABEL'S FIELD Add To My Top 10

Ask and You Shall Receive

Content +4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 22, 2013

Starring: Kevin Sorbo, Samuel Davis, Richard Dillard, Terri Merritt Bennett, William Buchanan

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: TBD

Distributor: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Director: Gordie Haakstad

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Tore Knos

Writer: Aron Flasher

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Chairman
Amy Pascal, Co-Chairman, and Jeff Blake, Vice Chairman
Sony Pictures Entertainment (Columbia Pictures/MGM/TriStar/Screen Gems/Affirm Films/Provident Films)
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000; Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(CCC, BBB, V, N, AA, M) Very strong Christian, evangelistic, moral worldview with coming to Christ and refuting bad behavior, with a young boy deciding to do the right thing; several fistfights where boy gets bloody nose, black eye, and man strong-arms teenager; no sex; brief upper male nudity; alcohol to get drunk; brief smoking image, but no drugs; and, the difficulties of teenage life are explored such as dating and peer pressure, attempted theft, and breaking and entering.


Summary:

ABEL’S FIELD is about an orphaned and abandoned high school student having problems making ends meet and taking care of his two younger sisters, while trying to deal with the jealous captain of the football team. ABEL’S FIELD has high caliber cinematography is moving and convicting.


Review:

ABEL’S FIELD is set in a small dying Texas town named Sinai.



High school teenager Seth is angry at God. First of all, his mother died in spite of his prayers. Secondly, his father, a trucker, has left home, leaving Seth with his two younger sisters.



Seth is trying to make everything work by doing two jobs. He’s an auto mechanic and a cook at the high school football snack stand.



Football is the heart of life in the small town. Seth was once a rising football star, but the circumstances of his life forced him to give it up. He has a half brother, who hates him and eventually tells him his father is also dead. These burdens are almost too much for a young man to bear. Aside from that, the team captain still has a grudge against him for being the better player. He takes every chance to beat up on Seth.



Eventually, the captain’s girlfriend takes an interest in Seth. This gives the captain another excuse for beating him up. The coach thinks Seth is the cause of the problems. So, he gives Seth a third job – trying to install a sprinkler system to fix the football field.



In doing this job, Seth has to work with Abel (played by Kevin Sorbo), a taciturn loner who gives Seth even more trouble. As it develops, however, Abel becomes Seth’s mentor.



When the bank starts to foreclose on Seth’s rundown house, he uses a stolen key to break into the school during a football game with the intention of stealing the cash on hand. Abel realizes what’s happening and tries to stop him. A pastor has been telling Seth to call out to God, but Seth is angry at God. He’s hears the Gospel and that his mother was a Christian, but he doesn’t believe it. So, the plot question is, will Seth stop trying to do it himself and call out to God?



ABEL’S FIELD has high caliber cinematography. The movie does a wonderful job of exploring wounded people and their need for forgiveness and grace. Seth’ problems are clear and compelling. The characters around him are real.



The mysterious Abel has his own problems. He’s running from something. When the coach wants to hire him, he doesn’t want his fingerprints taken. It turns out he’s never forgiven himself for a heinous crime, but in his failure, he’s able to help Seth with his problems.



ABEL’S FIELD is moving and convicting. It is much better than most faith-based movies and worth watching several times and sharing with others.


In Brief:

ABEL’S FIELD is about Seth, a high school student who’s raising his two younger sisters. High school teenager Seth is angry at God because his mother died and his father disappeared. To make ends meet, he works two part-time jobs. He gets in some trouble with the captain of the football team, who’s jealous of Seth. The coach thinks Seth is the problem, so he makes Seth help a taciturn loner named Abel install a sprinkler system on the football field. When the bank starts to foreclose on Seth’s rundown house, Seth considers stealing. Can Abel and the other people who care turn Seth’s heart to God?
ABEL’S FIELD has high caliber cinematography. The movie does a wonderful job of exploring wounded people and their need for forgiveness. Seth’ problems are clear and compelling. The characters around him are real. Abel has his own problems. It turns out he’s never forgiven himself for a heinous crime, but in his failure, he’s able to help Seth with his problems. ABEL’S FIELD is moving and convicting and worth watching several times and sharing with others.