CLOCKERS Add To My Top 10

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 15, 1995

Starring: Harvey Keitel, John Turturro, Delroy Lindo, & Mekhi Phifer

Genre: Detective Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 129 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures

Director: Spike Lee

Executive Producer:

Producer: Martin Scorsese, Spike Lee & Jon Kilik

Writer: Richard Prie & Spike Lee

Address Comments To:

Content:

(NA, LLL, VVV, A, D, C, M) Pagan worldview highlighting and discouraging crime, drug use & materialism; extensive foul language including 263 obscenities, 30 vulgarities & 11 profanities; moderate to extensive violence including many long lingering shots of bloody corpses, spitting up blood many times, fist fights, two symbolic rapes, & 3 point blank gunfire murders; alcohol use & abuse; crack cocaine use, abuse & sales; revenge, mercy & forgiveness themes; and, theft & smoking

Summary:

CLOCKERS, directed by Spike Lee, tells the story of two brothers suspected of murder: one, a family man; the other, a clocker or round-the-clock drug dealer. Bloody and obscenity-filled, Lee doesn't shy away from showing the depravity of drug dealing but crafts an insightful story which may discourage youths from taking a path of drugs and crime.

Review:

Clocker is slang for the lowest level of drug dealer, selling round the clock. The movie, CLOCKERS, directed by Spike Lee, tells the harrowing story of two Brooklyn brothers suspected of murder: one, a family man; and, the other, a clocker. Strike is a clocker trapped in a criminal lifestyle. He desires to stop selling crack cocaine, but his boss Rodney forbids him. In fact, Rodney wants Strike to pull a job on the side: murder a rival drug dealer. Strike goes with Rodney to Ahab's burger joint, and the rival drug dealer is shot dead. Yet, before the smoke clears, Strike's brother Victor is taking the rap for the crime. Investigators, Rocco Klein and Larry Mazilli aren't buying Victor's claim. In a surprise ending, Rodney sends out a hitman after Strike, and the tables-are-turned on the facts about the murder.

This movie is not for the squeamish. The opening sequence of bloody bodies is enough to turn iron stomachs. Bloody and obscenity-filled, Lee doesn't shy away from showing the depravity of violence and the entrapment of drug dealing. Yet, rather than reducing the film to a titillating violent shoot-em-up, he crafts a touching, insightful story which may educate and discourage youths from taking a similar path of drugs and crime. Ultimately, however, the film provides no real solutions to this serious problem.

In Brief: