Exporting Raymond

Laughter Is Universal

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 29, 2011

Starring: Phil Rosenthal

Genre: Documentary/Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 85 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films

Director: Phil Rosenthal

Executive Producer: John Woldenberg

Producer: Jim Czarnecki, Philip
Rosenthal

Writer: Philip Rosenthal

Address Comments To:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO
Meyer Gottlieb, President
Samuel Goldwyn Films
9570 West Pico Blvd., 4th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 860-3100; Fax: (310) 860-3195
Website: www.samuelgoldwynfilms.com; Email: info@samuelgoldwynfilms.com

Content:

(B, L, S, AA, D, M) Light moral worldview showing that laughter and family values are universal, in a humorous documentary about converting the family-oriented sitcom EVERYBODY LOVES RAYMOND to Russian television; five obscenities and profanities; no violence; animated depictions of the silhouettes of sexy women dancing, in James Bond-credits-style, is shown as a running gag but they are not graphic; no nudity; lots of alcohol use and suffering hangovers the next day; smoking; and, images of fictional family bickering.

Summary:

EXPORTING RAYMOND offers viewers a humorous and amusing look at the way in which the smash American sitcom EVERYBODY LOVES RAYMOND was translated and transformed for use in Russian television. EXPORTING RAYMOND shows that laughter and family values are universal, but there is brief foul language and some sensual content, so caution is warranted.

Review:

EXPORTING RAYMOND offers viewers a humorous and amusing look at the way in which the smash American sitcom EVERYBODY LOVES RAYMOND was translated and transformed for use in Russian television.

RAYMOND co-creator Philip Rosenthal first shows viewers the home in which he grew up, with his bickering but loving parents providing insights into how the Barone family of the sitcom came to be and the balance of their love-hate relationship developed. He then heads to Russia, and the balance of the documentary shows Rosenthal’s creative and cultural clashes with nearly everyone around him. Again, the clashes are conducted without much inappropriate language, but they can be sarcastic and a bit heated at times. Along the way, Rosenthal comes to a greater understanding of his fellow man on the other side of the planet in a formerly enemy nation, including the private lives of his co-workers and a poignant friendship he develops with his driver. Ultimately, the documentary shows that laughter and family values are universal and can overcome all differences.

Aside from the matter-of-fact way in which drinking and smoking are portrayed among the real-life Russians, EXPORTING RAYMOND has little objectionable content. There is brief foul language and some silhouettes of sexy women dancing, in James Bond-credits-style. The movie uses the silhouettes as a running gag, but they aren’t graphic. Still, EXPORTING RAYMOND is only likely to appeal only to older teenagers and some adults, particularly fans of the original sitcom, with zero interest to be found for younger children.

In Brief:

EXPORTING RAYMOND offers viewers a humorous and amusing look at the way in which the smash American sitcom EVERYBODY LOVES RAYMOND was translated and transformed for use in Russian television. RAYMOND co-creator Philip Rosenthal heads to Russia to oversee the transformation. Rosenthal clashes with nearly everyone around him. Along the way, however, he comes to a greater understanding of his fellow man on the other side of the planet in a formerly enemy nation, including the private lives of his co-workers. Rosenthal also develops a poignant friendship with his driver. Ultimately, the documentary shows that laughter and family values are universal and can overcome all differences.

Aside from the matter-of-fact way in which drinking and smoking are portrayed among the real-life Russians, EXPORTING RAYMOND has little objectionable content. There is brief foul language and some silhouettes of women dancing sensually, in James Bond-credits-style. The movie uses the silhouettes as a running gag, but they aren’t graphic. Still, EXPORTING RAYMOND is only likely to appeal only to older teenagers and some adults, particularly fans of the original sitcom, with zero interest to be found for younger children.