FIRST STRIKE Add To My Top 10

Nimble Chop-Socky

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Release Date: January 01, 1997

Starring: Jackie Chan & Chen Chen Wu

Genre: Action-Adventure

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 84 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Stanley Ton

Executive Producer: Leonard Ho

Producer: Bargie Tung

Writer:

Address Comments To:

Robert Shaye, CEO
Mitch Goldman, President
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Boulevard, Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
(310) 967-6682

Content:

(Pa, B, C, VVV, S, N, A, M) Pagan worldview with moral elements of good winning over evil & Christian funeral; no objectionable language; extensive but bloodless action violence including chases, shooting, snowmobile crash, falling into freezing water, threats with guns, assaults, shark attacks, fighting with sticks, etc.; no sex but heavy kissing; women in bikini & rear male nudity; alcohol use; and, smoking

Summary:

Jackie Chan performs his own stunts in FIRST STRIKE, a movie that has him thwarting a nuclear war head arms deal in the Ukraine and in Australia. Containing no sex and no foul language, it is noteworthy for not having bloody violence but rather attacks, chases and the like. There is a brief scene of rear male nudity, but it doesn’t have any martial arts religion or philosophy.

Review:

Schwarzenegger is funny and macho. Stallone is silent and macho. And Jackie Chan is funny, macho and nimble. A veteran of countless martial arts action pictures, Jackie Chan recently broke onto the American scene with RUMBLE IN THE BRONX. Continuing his American invasion, Chan, famed for performing his own stunts, quietly spoofs James Bond movies as he globe trots for the CIA in FIRST STRIKE.

Chan plays a Hong Kong police officer named Jackie who is contracted by the CIA and a Russian intelligence organization to retrieve a stolen Ukrainian nuclear warhead. In the Ukraine, Jackie follows a Chinese arms dealer named Tsui to an old log cabin outpost. (Tsui and Jackie used to be old friends.) While Tsui negotiates a trade, Jackie, wearing few clothes for sub-zero weather, radios for help. Jackie is discovered and escapes a gang of armed skiers by diving underwater into a frozen pond.

After warming up, Jackie discovers that Tsui is heading for Australia to visit his sister Anne, who works at an aquarium. Tsui delivers a warhead to her, which she places in a shark tank. In Australia, Jackie must escape various attacks, roof top chases, shark attacks, and even stripping at gun point, as he tries to thwart the nefarious deal.

Chan is one of the most likable action stars today, because he isn’t super human. He doesn’t keep a straight face, he doesn’t grunt and he doesn’t crack dumb one-liners. He does smile, wince at pain and genuinely act like an average guy stuck in some unbelievable situations. Parents will be relieved to know that this movie doesn’t have any objectionable language whatsoever. In fact, the attitude of the movie is very much like a Saturday afternoon children’s cliffhanger. It doesn’t have any sex, but one time Chan is stripped of his clothes to remove any electronic bugs that he might have been carrying, which reveals his rear-end.

FIRST STRIKE is also noteworthy for not having a large body count and bloody deaths. Sure, there are chases and fights with intent to kill and do harm, but Jackie always avoids danger. The pursuers usually end up hurting each other. Considering the brutal excesses of Stallone and Schwarzenegger, it is refreshing to see Chan perform with such enthusiasm and charisma.

Parents may want to know if there is any New Age philosophies that are attached to Chan’s martial arts. The answer is no. In fact, the only evidence of a religion is a Christian funeral where the Bible is read.

FIRST STRIKE isn’t altogether original. It does, after all, consciously borrow from James Bond movies, but it does have warmth, charm and bloodless violence. Chan should find an audience in America, and with a string of Hong Kong-made hits behind him, he may have a great future with re-releases in America.

In Brief:

A veteran of countless martial arts movies and famed for performing his own stunts, Jackie Chan continues his American invasion with FIRST STRIKE, a spoof of James Bond movies. Chan plays a Hong Kong police officer who is contracted by the CIA to retrieve a stolen Ukrainian nuclear warhead. In the Ukraine, Jackie follows a Chinese arms dealer named Tsui . Jackie is discovered and escapes a gang of armed skiers by diving into a frozen pond. Jackie then follows Tsui to Australia where he must escape various attacks, roof top chases and sharks, as he tries to retrieve the warhead.

Chan is one of the most likable action stars today, because he isn’t super human, he doesn’t keep a straight face, he doesn’t grunt, and he doesn’t crack one-liners. Parents will be relieved to know that this movie doesn’t have any objectionable language nor sex, but Chan is stripped of his clothes at one point to remove any electronic bugs thus revealing his rear-end. FIRST STRIKE is note-worthy for not having a large body count and bloody deaths. There are chases and fights with intent to kill and do harm, but Jackie always avoids danger. FIRST STRIKE consciously borrows from James Bond movies, but it does have warmth, charm and bloodless violence.