HACHI Add To My Top 10

Incredible Loyalty

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Violence        
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Release Date: March 09, 2010

Starring: Richard Gere, Sarah Roemer, Joan Allen, and Jason Alexander

Genre: Drama

Audience: All ages

Rating: G

Runtime: 93 minutes

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO
Sony Pictures Entrertainment
Sony Home Entertainment
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000; Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(B) A strong moral worldview showing very impressive loyalty; no foul language; no sex scenes, but married couple scene in bed together but covered up; no nudity; no violence; and nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

HACHI is a heartrending story of an adopted stray dog who teaches a whole city about loyalty. While very slow at times, it’s a G-rated, serious tearjerker with no objectionable elements.

Review:

If you love dogs and you want to drain your tear ducts and fill a handkerchief, see HACHI. It has all the conflict of a good night’s sleep and at times is so slow you may wish to fast forward, but if you have the patience to endure, the full effect is heart rending. You will remember HACHI.

The movie opens with an Akita puppy being shipped from Japan to the United States. The puppy arrives in a crate at a commuter train station in a Northeastern US suburb. The dog crate falls off a cart and the puppy escapes, only to be found by Professor Parker Wilson (played by Richard Gere). The professor tries to find the puppy a home but winds up getting attached and keeping the dog.

The remarkable thing about this dog is that it learns to accompany his master to the commuter train station each morning, returns home, then comes back to the station just in time to meet his master. Much of the movie is a love story between a dog and his owner. The professor tries unsuccessfully to train Hachi to fetch a ball, but they both get blasted by a skunk. But, this is not some Beethoveen-the-dog style comedy. It can get a bit tiresome as the love between dog and master grows.

What makes this movie worth seeing is the very long last act by the dog. Don’t look for a daring rescue. Don’t put down your money hoping for cute antics. Be prepared to see a dog show a city the meaning of loyalty.

HACHI is based on a true story from the 1920’s in Japan. It was made into a popular Japanese movie in 1987. This version ships the Akita puppy to the US and Americanizes the setting. What rings true about it is the loyalty possible in a dog.

In Brief:

HACHI opens with an Akita puppy being shipped from Japan to the United States. The puppy arrives in a crate at a commuter train station in a Northeastern US suburb. The dog crate falls off a cart and the puppy escapes only to be found by Professor Parker Wilson. The professor tries to find the puppy a home but winds up getting attached and keeping the dog. Hachi learns to accompany his master to the commuter train station each morning, return home, then come back to the station just in time to meet his master. Much of the movie is a love story between a dog and his owner.

HACHI sometimes gets tiresome watching the love between dog and master grow. What makes this movie worth seeing is the very long last act by the dog. Don’t look for a daring rescue. Don’t hope for cute antics. Be prepared to see a dog teach a city a lesson. The movie is based on a true story from the 1920s in Japan. It was made into a popular Japanese movie in 1987. This clean, wholesome version brings the Akita puppy to the US and Americanizes the setting.