LEOLO

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 07, 1993

Starring: Ginette Reno, Pierre
Bourgault, Maxime Collin, &
Giuditta Del Vecchio

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: No MPAA rating

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: Fine Line Features

Director: Jean-Claude Lauzon

Executive Producer:

Producer: Jean-Claude Lauzon

Writer: Lyse Lafontaine & Aimee Denis

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, A/D, L, N, SSS, VVV) Humanistic worldview complete with: substance abuse; 4 or 5 obscenities; scene of cat being killed on a dare; scene of Leo attempting to murder his grandfather; scene of two boys fornicating with the same girl; masturbation; urination & defecation; and, many grotesque & offensive scenes.

Summary:

Filled with fornication, violence and grotesqueries, the French film LEOLO tells the story of a young boy's coming of age within an extremely dysfunctional family and within the confines of an East Montreal tenement. Hailed by some critics as a crowd-pleaser, probably the only crowd this film will please is that exclusive group of critics whose idiosyncratic tastes lure gullible patrons into art-houses to watch characters whom they would feel uncomfortable sitting next to on the subway.

Review:

The French film LEOLO begins with the title character urinating off the balcony of his family's tenement--and it is all downhill from there. This is the deeply tragic and disturbing story of Leo Lozeau, a sensitive, imaginative boy who is so repulsed by the madness of his family and the squalor of his surroundings that he escapes into a fantasy world. Changing his identity, he calls himself Leolo Lozone and dreams of Sicily where he is in the company of Bianca, the beautiful Italian girl he watches from his window in real life. Leo's mother is convinced that "A s--t a day will keep the doctor away," and we get to see a close-up of this obese lady sitting on the toilet encouraging her son to "Push, like Mama." We get to see a lot of other things as well: rats crawling over dishes; Leo arousing himself with a piece of steak (which his mother later cooks); and, the inside of the asylum where most of Leo's family are kept.

Critic Janet Maslin has hailed LEOLO as a "real crowd-pleaser," but the only crowd this film is likely to please is that exclusive group of critics whose idiosyncratic tastes lure gullible patrons into art-houses to watch characters whom they would feel uncomfortable sitting next to on the subway.

In Brief: