MY FAMILY

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 05, 1995

Starring: Jimmie Smits, Edward James
Olmos, Esai Morales, Scott
Bakula, & Jenny Gago

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 123 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Gregory Nava EXECUTIVE
PRODUCER: Francis Ford Coppola

Executive Producer:

Producer: Francis Ford Coppola PRODUCER:
Gregory Nava

Writer: Gregory Nava & Anna Thomas

Address Comments To:

Content:

(NA, AB, B, LLL, VVV, NN, A, PC, M) New Age worldview ("circle of life") with a mixture of spiritism & Roman Catholicism & some biblically moral elements (marriage & family); 23 obscenities, 12 profanities & moderate vulgarities throughout; 2 violent killings & 1 beating; upper female nudity; alcohol use; smoking; politically correct, yet moral view of minorities.

Summary:

MY FAMILY stars Jimmie Smits in a warm, witty and tragic story of a Mexican family making a new life in Los Angeles. While the movie celebrates family and traditional values, brief nudity, violence and vulgar language make this movie unfit for family viewing. It also mixes elements of New Age and pagan spiritism with Roman Catholicism.

Review:

Told by the oldest living son of Jose Sanchez, MY FAMILY traces the family's history from rural Mexico in 1926 to their new life in East Los Angeles. As an 18-year-old, Jose leaves Mexico on foot to find work in an elderly uncle's small corn field. Jose meets Maria, they are married, and the two raise six children. Their story is told by Paco (Edward James Olmos in narration), and the Sanchez family experiences its share of troubles and joys. However, it is the life of youngest son Jimmie (Jimmie Smits) that emerges as the real story.

Director/writer Gregory Nava has created a masterful film. MY FAMILY is a warm, witty, dramatic, and tender portrait of a simple, loving family and features excellent acting by Jimmie Smits. As a man torn by the struggle between good and evil, Smits superbly reflects the whole gamut of emotions. While not a major character, the engaging voice of Edward James Olmos narrates the movie as the character of Paco and successfully captures the essence of the family's story. The movie stresses the importance of love and family and celebrates the sanctity of marriage. The Sanchezes also teach their children respect for authority, the environment and honest work. Regrettably, brief nudity, violence, vulgar language, and a mixture of New Age elements and pagan spiritism with Roman Catholicism mar the movie.

In Brief: