OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 30, 1990

Starring: Dana Carvey, Todd Graff, Julia
Campbell, & Robert Loggia

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience:

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: Approximately 105 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures

Director: Donald Petrie

Executive Producer:

Producer: Mark R. Gordon & Christopher
Meledandri

Writer: Mitchel Katlin & Nat Bernstein

Address Comments To:

Content:

Profanities and obscenities; one obscene gesture; brief violence; and, stealing, lying and deception which are relevant to the story line.

Summary:


Review:

Dana Carvey (NBC's "Saturday Night Live" church lady), stars as Eddie Farrell, a down-on-his-luck, small time con man in this rather average tale of mistaken identity and intentional deceit. Weary of his mundane existence, Eddie longs for a better life of new cars and children playing on neatly-trimmed suburban lawns.

He gets his wish when, through a series of coincidences, opportunities and mistaken identity, he disguises himself as an Ivy League snob to cavort among Chicago's elite. Thrust into corporate high life and country club living, Eddie hopes to line his pockets with their cash. While he's a shark out of water with regard to legitimate business, Eddie's experience with gaining people's confidence and his ability to think on his feet endear him both to the boss and his daughter.

The only thing standing in the way of happiness for Eddie is his sordid past, and the fact that he and his closest pal, Louie, have accidentally lost $60,000 which belongs to a ruthless hood. With a combination to the boss' safe at his disposal, Eddie must decide which way of life to choose. Will he continue to build a life on lies, or follow the advice in Proverbs 28:13? "He who conceals his sin will not prosper, but whoever confesses and renounces them finds mercy."

The final 30 minutes resolve the dilemma, by far the most interesting segment of the movie. Up until this point, the movie drags, kept afloat only by Eddie's energetic and believable performance as a none-too-confident confidence man. Although deceit is portrayed in a comedic light, the film must be commended for implying that through the way of truth one can find fulfillment and happiness in life. Of course, real and lasting joy can only be found in Jesus, who is the "way and the truth and the life" (John 14:6).

In Brief: