PASSION OF MIND

Distortion of Reality

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 26, 2000

Starring: Demi Moore, Stellan Skarsgaard
& William Fichtner

Genre: Romantic thriller

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 105 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Classics

Director: Alain Berliner

Executive Producer: Gary Lucchesi & Richard S.
Wright

Producer: Ronald Bass & Carole Scotta

Writer: Ron Bass & David Field

Address Comments To:

Paramount Classics
5555 Melrose Avenue
Chevalier #215
Los Angeles, CA 90039
Phone: (323) 956-2000
Fax: (323) 862-1103

Content:

(RoRoRo, Pa, LL, SS, NN, A, DD, M) Strong romantic worldview of woman so controlled by her emotions that she cannot distinguish dream from reality & pagan element of man asking, “If nothing & nobody are not perfect, why do you want to be nobody or nothing?”; 3 obscenities & 10 strong profanities; no violence; depicted fornication, sensual bathtub scene, propositions for sex, & man voices sexual desires to woman; partial nudity during sex, upper male nudity & upper female nudity through transparent garment; alcohol use; smoking & woman takes pills to keep her awake; and, deception.

Summary:

PASSION OF MIND stars Demi Moore as Marie, a widowed mother of two living in France, and as Marty, a single literary agent executive in New York City. Torn between to separate worlds, she must confront which life is reality and which one is a figment of her imagination. Contains sex, partial nudity & some foul language.

Review:

Demi Moore plays a split personality in PASSION OF MIND. As Marie, she is a widowed mother of two, and as Marty she is a single executive in New York. When she finds romance in both of these worlds, she has to face the truth, thereby risking one of her two lovers.

Marie Talridge spends time with her two daughters in the French countryside, that is, until she falls asleep. Each morning she awakens to find herself in one of two worlds: France or New York. She confides to her close friend, Kim, of her dreams in which she is an executive in New York. Each day she describes in detail what has happened that "day." Kim takes Marie to see a therapist, who diagnoses Marie as a split personality. The therapist contends that her life in New York is a nocturnal fantasy she has of a career and a fast-paced single life.

Virtually the same diagnosis is given to her as Marty, a literary executive amid the bustling backdrop of New York, by her therapist there. He tells her that her fantasy of living in France is a sign of an overworked woman who is yearning for a family. Her mind clouded by her past, she lives out each of the lives as though they were true.

Things change, however, when she finds love in both of these lives. William, a writer who sweeps Marie off her feet, loves her and her children deeply. He romances her, telling her his desire to make love to her. Having been alone since she was widowed, she eventually succumbs to William. Soon after, back in New York, Marty is quite shaken about how her relationship with William is, and relies on her friend, Aaron Reilly, for his friendship. Aaron is clear about wanting to get to know her better, and she confides in him about her life in France and about William.

Marie tells William as well, and eventually trouble begins to brew in both worlds. William is jealous, and asks about the "other man." Aaron, although he already knows about William, tells Marty that he could never have children with her because of her other life. In bizarre fashion with a few twists, Marie/Marty eventually discovers the truth, though she risks losing one of her lovers.

This story, though it sounds complicated, was not hard to follow. The idea of a person thinking they are "living" two lives in two different countries, however, may be a little hard to grasp. This is not because it seems paranormal, but because of the clear depiction of Moore’s character transferring in and out of the fantasy life like clockwork (waking up each morning in a different world). Though the reality of both worlds is strong, there is no link of spiritism or magic to the process, but a matter of psychosis.

PASSION OF MIND, though entertaining in its originality, was like reading a fantasy romance novel. A woman gets caught up in a dream, so much so that she cannot distinguish it from reality. One world she can control, and when she is confronted with facing the truth, it is obvious that she doesn’t want to give up that world. Despite its interesting story, PASSION OF MIND is marred by partial nudity, depictions of fornication and some foul language.

In Brief:

PASSION OF MIND stars Demi Moore as Marie, a widow living in France, and as Marty, a single literary executive in New York City. Living two lives, she must confront which life is reality and which is fantasy. This story, though it sounds complicated, was not hard to follow. The idea of a person thinking they are ‘living’ two lives in two different countries, however, may be hard to grasp, because of the clear depiction of Moore’s character transferring in and out of the fantasy life like clockwork (waking up each morning in a different world). Though the reality of both worlds is strong, there is no link of spiritism or magic to the process, but a matter of psychosis.

PASSION OF MIND, though entertaining in its originality, was like reading a fantasy romance novel. A woman gets caught up in a dream, so much so that she cannot distinguish it from reality. One world she can control, and when she is confronted with facing the truth, it is obvious she doesn’t want to give up that world. Despite its interesting story, PASSION OF MIND is marred by partial nudity, fornication and some foul language