RIFF RAFF

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Robert Carlyle, Emer McCourt,
Jimmy Coleman, & George Moss

Genre: Black comedy

Audience:

Rating: no MPAA rating

Runtime: Approximately 100 minutes

Distributor: Fine Line Cinema

Director: Kenneth Loach

Executive Producer:

Producer: Bill Jesse

Writer: Sally Hibbin

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, LLL, NN, S, O, VV, A/D) A neo-socialist film with: at least 92 obscenities plus 18 instances of crude language & 12 profanities; some semi-nude scenes (two obscured & man in bathtub covers his front with hard hat); implied sexual intercourse & reference to sex act; occultic references & horoscope discussed; several scenes with moderate violence--fist fights, fall from roof, dog attack, & property destruction; and, drug injection & alcohol consumption.

Summary:

The neo-socialist film RIFF RAFF charts an English construction worker's struggles to come to terms with life in the big city and with his co-workers and their scams. The movie contains credible acting and provides an interesting look at English working class life, but it also contains excessive obscenities and profanities.

Review:

Set in England in 1990, RIFF RAFF is a neo-socialist film which centers around a construction crew renovating an old hospital into luxury apartments. To help translate the workers' heavy accents, more than half of the movie has American-English subtitles. Stevie, recently emerged from prison for thievery, hires on with the rowdy crew. Larry Reilly organizes the men to fix up squatter accommodations for Stevie. Shortly, Stevie meets and falls in love with another tenant, Susan Miles, who is behind on her rent. Soon, Susan moves in with Stevie in hopes that they will get married. Meanwhile, worries escalate about safety on the work-site. Larry suggests unionizing. When he brings his safety concerns to his ruthless, dishonest boss, he is fired. Stevie and another worker carry out their revenge against the construction company.

The acting in RIFF RAFF is credible in its portrayal of working-class England. Unfortunately, the film promotes revenge as the way of righting a wrong. In addition, many of the 92 obscenities and 12 profanities are deleted from the subtitles, but can still be understood. Some other objectionable elements are: implied sexual immorality, semi-nudity, violence, drug use, and occultism.

In Brief: