RUGRATS IN PARIS: THE MOVIE Add To My Top 10

Toddler Tales

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Release Date: November 17, 2000

Starring: Christine Cavanaugh, Cheryl Chase, E. G. Daily, Kath Soucie, Melanie Chartoff, John Lithgow, Debbie Reynolds, & Susan Sarandon

Genre: Animated Comedy

Audience: Children

Rating: G

Runtime: 74 minutes

Address Comments To:

Sherry Lansing, Chairman
Motion Pictures Group
Paramount Pictures
A Paramount Communications Company
5555 Melrose Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90038-3197
Phone: (323) 956-5000
Website: www.paramount.com

Content:

(BB, Ro, V, N, M) Mostly moral worldview of family with some romantic elements; no foul language but some frequent scatological elements such as discussion of “poop” amongst children, talk about a bidet as a “potty that squirts you back,” implied vomiting, baby takes bag of implied vomit with him after thinking it is food, depicted baby wets pants, flatulence, & depiction of dog urinating on wall; robot malfunctions, robots battle with depicted fire, smoke & parts crashing into each other & destroying surroundings; dog knocks over waiter with tray, man falls with other men subsequently falling on top of him, man shot into ride prop, dream sequence with some monsters, woman thrown out of car by villain, & some pushing among children; no sex; depictions of babies’ buttocks, men in sumo outfits with partial rear nudity & woman seen in lingerie after her dress is ripped away; and, miscellaneous elements including lying, revenge & hints of blackmail.

Summary:

TV’s Rugrats take their adventures overseas in RUGRATS IN PARIS, a movie based on the hit cartoon series. Despite the movie’s good moral intentions, it contains a few scatological elements that may be questionable for younger children.

Review:

Based on the hit television series, RUGRATS IN PARIS depicts the overseas adventures of Chuckie, Tommy, Angelica, Phil, Lil, Dil, and the rest of the Rugrats gang as they search for a new mom for Chuckie.

Chuckie Finster, though only a toddler, knows the value of having a mother. Having lost his own mother, he longs for a new mother to “comfort and hold him.” When he finds out his dad, Chazz, is starting to date again, Chuckie gets excited that he may get a new mom. With the encouragement of his best friend Tommy Pickles and the rest of the group, he feels confident that it will be soon.

Meanwhile, overseas in Paris, France, Coco LaBouche is infuriated by the failure of Reptar, a robotic monster, to perform in her production. A seemingly heartless woman, she calls Tommy’s dad, Stu, who is Reptar’s creator, demanding that he and his entire family come immediately to Paris. Soon, the Pickles and the Finsters are on their way, taking the search for Chazz’s dating life and Chuckie’s new mom to Europe.

Coco, however, despises children, until her boss informs her chances for the promotion she seeks are better with a stable family life. Overhearing the conversation while scarfing down chocolates is Angelica Pickles, Tommy’s older and bossier sister whose intentions are generally for her own benefit. When Coco discovers Angelica hiding under a table eating her sweets, Angelica says that she can find a husband for Coco so she can avoid being punished. Coco agrees and promises that she will give Angelica her own parade and let her be the flower girl at the wedding.

Angelica tells Coco about Chazz, who interested in Coco’s assistant, Kira. Coco quickly intervenes, and with all of the charm she can muster, she begins to sweep Chazz off his feet. Chuckie, however, doesn’t care for Coco at all and longs for a princess to be his new mom. Soon, Coco’s true self is revealed, and everyone discovers that romance and fairy tales do not always measure up to true love.

Though RUGRATS IN PARIS stresses looking beyond temporary things to things that are everlasting, it also shows, regrettably, hasty and poor decision-making by the adults. Furthermore, there are frequent “gross” elements involved with toddlers such as: discussion of “poop,” talk about a bidet as a “potty that squirts you back,” implied vomiting, baby takes bag of implied vomit with him thinking it is food, baby wets pants, flatulence, and depiction of dog urinating on wall.

Even so, the celebrity voicing of Coco (Susan Sarandon of ANYWHERE BUT HERE), her bad assistant Jean Claude (John Lithgow of TV’s THIRD ROCK FROM THE SUN) and Lulu (Debbie Reynolds) is well done.

Regrettably, the scenes don’t seem to flow well together. For instance, there is an early scene where the GODFATHER movies are spoofed. This scene is clever and funny, but somewhat out of place.

Ultimately, RUGRATS IN PARIS is a fun movie with positive references to family and emphasizing morals, that is flawed by some scatological elements. While toddlers often do things that are not exactly pleasant, using these actions as comic points throughout a movie may hinder any parental efforts to try to deter or minimize these things, especially among small children.

In Brief:

TV’s Rugrats take their adventures overseas in RUGRATS IN PARIS. Having lost his own mother, toddler Chuckie Finster longs for a new mother to “comfort and hold him.” When he finds out his dad, Chazz, is starting to date again, Chuckie gets excited that he may get a new mom. With the encouragement of his best friend Tommy Pickles and the rest of the group, he feels confident that it will be soon. Meanwhile, overseas in Paris, France, Coco LaBouche is infuriated by the failure of Reptar, a robotic monster, to perform in her production. A seemingly heartless woman, she calls Tommy’s dad, Raptor’s creator, demanding that he and his entire family come immediately to Paris. Soon, the Pickles and the Finsters are on their way, taking the search for Chazz’s dating life and Chuckie’s new mom to Europe.

RUGRATS IN PARIS is a fun movie emphasizing morals, that is flawed by scatological elements that are often gross. While toddlers often do things that are not exactly pleasant, using these actions as comic points throughout a movie may hinder any parental efforts to try to deter or minimize these things, especially among small children