THE HUNGRY BACHELORS CLUB

Appetite For Dysfunction

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 01, 1999

Starring: Jorja Fox, Bill Nunn, David Shackelford, Peter Murnik, & Michael Des Barres

Genre: Adult comedy

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 89 minutes

Distributor: Transcontinental Films

Director: Gregory Ruzzin

Executive Producer:

Producer: Dan Gifford & Amy Sommer Gifford

Writer: Fred Dresch & Ron Ratliff

Address Comments To:

Israel Shaked


Transcontinental Films


c/o Raleigh Studios


650 N. Bronson Ave


Suites 108-207


Los Angeles, CA 90004

Content:

(PaPa, RoRo, HH, FRFR, B, L, N, S, AA, DD, M) Pagan worldview with romantic, humanistic, false-religious, & moral elements including characters concerned with noble ideas according to their own definition, a single mother desiring to "rent her womb with an egg to buy" as a surrogate mother, monetary bargaining with discussion of what a life is "worth," mention of buyer not financially responsible if child is born handicapped, man implied to be fornicating with woman but shuns her desire for marriage, a reference to the Lord as the creator of children, & strong false religious elements including a pagan rite of Mayan gods, a declaration of the "afterlife within ourselves" & other references to "the gods"; four mild obscenities including child saying "d*m" with parental rebuke; upper male nudity & partial rear nudity with man's pants slipping a bit; no implied sex but implied relationships involving fornication; alcohol use & abuse; substance abuse including depiction of character on cocaine; and, implied threats, revenge & reference to past molestation.


Summary:

THE HUNGRY BACHELORS CLUB is an aspiring chef's idea for the name of a restaurant that she dreams of owning. Having little money and sharing custody of her son, she decides to become a surrogate mother in order to finance her dream. Despite the few heartwarming scenes in this film, the lack of regard for morals and the inability to construct a plot with direction is enough to make audiences lose their appetite.


Review:

Contrary to what some may think of this film's title, THE HUNGRY BACHELORS CLUB is not a combination of THE BACHELOR and FIGHT CLUB. It is, however, an aspiring chef's idea for the name of a restaurant. Having little money and shared custody of her son, a female chef decides to become a surrogate mother in order to finance her dreams of owning her own restaurant. In pursuit of her goal, she discovers new relationships and future desires.
As a single mother, Delmar Youngblood longs to open up her own restaurant and even has a name picked out for it: The Hungry Bachelors Club. This dream seems like a long shot, however, because she must financially support her son and her mother. Delmar also shares custody of her son with the son's father. During a dinner party for friends, her best friend's beau discusses his boss's need to find a surrogate mother. He proposes the idea to Delmar, who considers the $25,000 for the deal as an opportunity to open up her own restaurant.
During Delmar's party, a friend of her mother's dies of a "broken heart" over her daughter's rebellion. Delmar quickly summons her brother Jet (Peter Murnik) who arrives with his friend Marlon (David Shackelford) and a new acquaintance, and ex-convict, named Moses (Bill Nunn). Jet performs a pagan rite over the woman. The entire group, including Delmar's best friend Hortense (Suzanne Mara) and her boyfriend, take part in the sÈance while Jet acknowledges Mayan gods. After the ceremony, the dead woman's daughter, Missy (Katherine Kendall), shows up crying, obviously on cocaine. Jet comforts her. After she begins recovering from her drug addiction, the two soon begin dating. Jet discovers that Missy's rebellion grew out of anger toward her mom for ignoring the fact that Missy's father was molesting her.
Delmar meets with the barren, alcoholic and ditsy Mrs. Spinner and decides to become a surrogate mother for her. Later, Delmar meets with Mr. Spinner (Michael Des Barres) to arrange the deal. She asks for the $25,000 to be paid up front, and another $25,000 upon the delivery of the baby, provided it is healthy and without defect. Mr. Spinner, though hesitant at first, thinks about his priority of having an heir and accepts.
When she is about 5 months along, Delmar begins to develop a romantic relationship with Moses, who proves to be a kind, caring man and a good cook as well. The two decide to be partners with the restaurant, and everyone gets involved to help. Realizing her delivery date is nearing, Delmar wants to keep the baby, and she and Moses come up with a plan to get out of her contract with Mr. Spinner. The ending, though intended to take on a twist, seems to present new questions that don't relate to the original plot points, resulting in confusion and disappointment.
Although there are a few elements of nobility throughout the film, the theme is predominantly a humanistic approach to life situations. The belittlement of childbearing, pregnancy and motherhood brings an uncanny callousness to the movie's characters. Delmar's character refers to her part in the surrogate process as "a womb to rent and an egg to buy." The mention of the $25,000 not having to be paid if the child is born with any defects infers the baby is merely merchandise, rather than a life. Even when Delmar decides to keep the baby, the reasons and feelings behind it are either non-existent or of little depth.
THE HUNGRY BACHELORS CLUB takes on several social issues with flippant ease because they are not visibly dealt with in a meaningful way. Shallow characters doing whatever they please hints at political correctness, but ultimately results in a hedonistic, pagan worldview. Making matters worse, the movie is not directed very well and the story is confusing.
This movie also contains a few mild obscenities, including the use of one by a child that is rebuked by a parent. There is no sex, or nudity, with the exception of partial rear nudity comparable to the 'refrigerator repairman' on TV's SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE. Despite the few heartwarming scenes in this film, the lack of regard for morals and the inability to construct a plot with direction is enough to make audiences lose their appetite.


In Brief:

THE HUNGRY BACHELORS CLUB is an aspiring chef's idea for the name of a restaurant. Having little money and shared custody of her son, Delmar decides to become a surrogate mother in order to finance her dreams of owning her own restaurant. In pursuit of her goal, she discovers new relationships, new plans and a new future.



Although there are a few elements of nobility throughout the film, the underlying theme is predominantly a hedonistic approach to life situations. Some scenes belittle childbearing, pregnancy and motherhood, bringing an uncanny callousness to the movie's characters. Delmar's character refers to her part in the surrogate process as "a womb to rent and an egg to buy." Also, a pagan rite is performed, a sÈance is conducted and cocaine use is indulged. THE HUNGRY BACHELORS CLUB takes on several social issues with ease because they are not really addressed. This movie contains a few mild obscenities, partial rear nudity, elements of false religion, and no sex. Despite the few heartwarming scenes in this film, its lack of regard for morality and inability to construct an understandable story with competent direction is enough to make audiences lose their appetite.