THE LITTLE VAMPIRE

Children of the Night

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 27, 2000

Starring: Jonathan Lipnicki, Richard E.
Grant, Rollo Weeks, Jim
Carter, Alice Kirge, Pamela
Gidley, Tommy Hinkley, & Anna
Popplewell

Genre: Children’s Fantasy

Audience: Older children & adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 97 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Uli Edel

Executive Producer: Anthony Waller, Alexander
Buchman & Larry Wilson

Producer: Richard Claus

Writer: Larry Wilson & Karey
Kirkpatrick

Address Comments To:

Robert Shaye, Chairman
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811

Content:

(O, B, Ab, L, V, A, M) Slight occult worldview where “good guys” use magic to help free people from vampire curse with some moral elements & a couple anti-Christian elements, though Jesus Christ is not Himself directly blasphemed; 2 mild “My God” profanities & vampire hunter says he’s going to send vampires “straight to Hell”; mild violence & scary scenes such as child has nightmares about vampire hunters chasing vampires & vampire hunter shoots wooden stakes at vampires & tries to run people over with his truck; no sex; no nudity; alcohol use; no smoking; and, lying, child frightens bullies & some disobedience from children characters.

Summary:

THE LITTLE VAMPIRE is a children’s movie about a little boy who helps a family of vampires use magic to change back into normal mortal people. There is a moral thrust to the movie’s story, but there is also a slight occult worldview and a mild anti-biblical motif concerning a nasty vampire hunter.

Review:

THE LITTLE VAMPIRE is a problematic children’s movie that turns the vampire myth inside out. Instead of rooting for the vampire hunters, the movie asks its audience to root for the vampires.

Based on a series of children’s stories by Angela Sommer-Bodenburg, the movie stars Jonathan Lipnicki of STUART LITTLE as a 9-year-old American boy named Tony. Tony has just moved to a small village in Scotland with his parents. Lonely and with no new friends in sight, Tony begins to have nightmares about vampires and becomes obsessed by the myths about them.

One night, Tony gets a spooky visit from a large bat, which transforms before his eyes into a 9-year-old vampire boy named Rudolph. A nasty vampire hunter named Rookery is in hot pursuit of Rudolph, who has wandered too far from his family’s crypt in a nearby cemetery. Rudolph is extremely hungry and weak, so Tony helps Rudolph find a farm with some cows for him to feed upon.

Rudolph’s vampire family has adapted their cursed lifestyle to feed on cows. They are waiting for the 300-year arrival of a comet, so they can use a magic amulet to transform themselves, and the rest of their kin, back into mortal people. The problem is, however, one of their dead ancestors has hidden away an important missing piece of the amulet. In the rest of the movie, Tony helps them find the missing piece and fend off the vampire hunter.

THE LITTLE VAMPIRE is choppy in parts, and the characters need to be developed better. In the story, the action is focused on helping the vampire people change back into normal people. Tony risks physical harm in helping his friends, so, to that extent, the story has a moral end, and everything turns out positive in the end. On the other hand, however, the “good guys” in THE LITTLE VAMPIRE must use magic to make the vampires mortal, so, to that extent, the story has an occult worldview where magic plays an important role.

Another problematic part of the movie is the fact that the vampire hunter has rigged a hand-held crucifix with fluorescent lights on it to help him fend off the vampires. The cross does seem to have a negative effect on the vampires, who shun it. This may not have presented a problem since, after all, the vampires are trying to turn into mortal people who no longer have to shun the cross. However, in one scene, a character kicks away the cross in the vampire hunter’s hand while saying, “I don’t think so!” Thus, there is a slight anti-biblical theme to THE LITTLE VAMPIRE, although Jesus Christ Himself is not directly blasphemed or mentioned.

The biggest problem is that this movie will confuse the children to whom it is being marketed. Therefore, it is not recommended.

In Brief:

THE LITTLE VAMPIRE is a problematic children’s movie that turns the vampire myth inside out. Instead of rooting for the vampire hunters, the movie asks its audience to root for the vampires. Jonathan Lipnicki of STUART LITTLE stars as a 9-year-old American boy named Tony whose family has just moved to a small village in Scotland with his parents. Tony befriends a family of vampires who want to use a magic amulet to transform themselves back into normal, mortal people while trying to avoid a nasty vampire hunter. Tony risks physical harm to help his strange new friends.

In the story of THE LITTLE VAMPIRE, the action is focused on helping the vampire people change back into normal people, so, to that extent, the story has a moral end. On the other hand, the “good guys” in THE LITTLE VAMPIRE must use magic to make the vampires mortal, so, to that extent, the story has an occult worldview where magic plays an important role. There is also a little mild foul language and an anti-biblical element involving a cross, the famous icon used in many a tale about vampires, including this one