THE RISING PLACE Add To My Top 10

A Life Lived Boldly

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Language        
Violence        
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Release Date: November 08, 2002

Starring: Laurel Holloman, Elise Neal, Mark Webber, Billy Campbell, Gary Cole, Tess Harper, and Frances Fisher

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13 (for elements of
violence)

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: Flatland Pictures and ZenPix

Director: Tom Rice

Executive Producer:

Producer: Tom Rice and Tracy A. Ford

Writer: Tom Rice

Address Comments To:

Flatland Pictures
407 N. Sycamore Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Phone: (323) 634-0217

Content:

(C, L, V) Christian worldview; three profanities; man beats man and man pushes woman.


Summary:

In THE RISING PLACE, Emily Hodge falls in love with a soldier, becomes a single mother, deals with the shame of her situation, and fights the oppression and prejudice of the time. While THE RISING PLACE deals with subjects as politically correct as the fight against racism, it portrays the less popular theme of faith in, and love for, God as integral to the story as the characters themselves.


Review:

THE RISING PLACE is a poignant period piece about a young woman named Emily (Laurel Holloman) coming of age of in World War II Mississippi. The story begins as Virginia Wilder reads through her Aunt Millie’s (Alice Drummond) letters as Millie lies ill during Christmas.
The movie follows the travails of Emily Hodge as she falls in love with a soldier, bears his child as a single mother and deals with the shame. The child’s father has returned to the service. She boldly seeks him out hoping to convince him to marry her and start a family. Emily eventually ends her search deciding to put her child up for adoption.
Throughout her own struggle, Emily fights the oppression and prejudice of the time. She loyally continues her friendships with two other outcasts: Wilma (Elise Neal), a young black woman, shunned due to the color of her skin, and Will Bacon, a detested draft dodger. She stands by her friends regardless of what it costs her personally.
Tom Rice has woven a brilliant story of courage infused with faith. While THE RISING PLACE deals with subjects as politically correct as the fight against racism, it portrays the less popular theme of faith in, and love for, God as integral to the story as the characters themselves. A devout Christian, Rice worked as a paperboy while finding investors to finance this labor of love. He has assembled a wonderful cast of seasoned actors. Due to his efforts, THE RISING PLACE has all ready garnered a bevy of awards. It is a sweet tale of a life lived boldly.
Broadway legend Jennifer Holliday appears in the film as a Jook Joint owner. She performs three original songs that she wrote especially for the film. In addition to fine acting and music, the lush cinematography underscores the heat and humidity of the Mississippi delta. Amazingly, Rice did this period piece with original music and costumes on a micro budget. Spielberg, watch out.


In Brief:

THE RISING PLACE is a girl’s coming-of-age story set in World War II Mississippi. Emily Hodge (Laurel Holloman) falls in love with a soldier, becomes a single mother, deals with the shame of her situation, eventually ending her search for the father and putting her child up for adoption. Simultaneously, she fights the oppression and prejudice of the time. Throughout her own struggle, Emily continues her friendships with two other social outcasts: a young black woman named Wilma (Elise Neal), and Will Bacon, a draft dodger. She stands by her friends regardless of what it costs her personally.
Amazingly, writer/director/producer Tom Rice did this period piece with original music and costumes on a micro budget. A devout Christian, Tom worked as a paperboy while finding investors to finance this labor of love. He has assembled a wonderful cast of seasoned actors. He has woven a brilliant story of courage infused with faith. While dealing with a subject as socially acceptable as the fight against racism, Rice honestly portrays faith in and love for God as integral to the story as the characters themselves. It is a sweet tale of a life lived boldly.