TYPHOON

Not a Storm Worth Weathering

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 02, 2006

Starring: Jang Dong-gun, Lee Jeong-jae,
Lee Mi-yeon, and David McInnis

Genre: Thriller

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 125 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Classics

Director: Kwak Kyung-taek

Executive Producer: Miky Lee

Producer: None

Writer: Kwak Kyung-taek

Address Comments To:

David Dinerstein and Ruth Vitale
Co-Presidents
Paramount Classics
A Division of Paramount Pictures
5555 Melrose Avenue
Chevalier Building. Suite 215
Los Angeles, CA 90038-3197
Phone: (323) 956-2000
Fax: (323) 862-1103
Website: www.paramountclassics.com

Content:

(Pa, B, Co, AC, AP, P, LL, VVV, N, AA, D, MM) Mixed pagan worldview with light moral elements of justice, compassion, and protection of the innocent and other redemptive elements such as depicting a strong bond between siblings, as well as some communist, anti-communist, patriotic and anti-patriotic, anti-American elements; nine obscenities, including a few ‘f’ words, and two strong profanities; very strong violence including many shootings, stabbings, explosions, car-chases, and blood; no sexual content; naturalistic upper male nudity in a few scenes; alcohol consumption in a scene in which a man takes a few shots of whiskey; light cigarette smoking in a couple scenes; and, a central theme of revenge, suicide and deception.

Summary:

TYPHOON is an edgy political thriller about modern-day pirates planning a massive attack on North and South Korea. With a pagan worldview, foul language, graphic violence, and a central theme of revenge, TYPHOON is not a storm worth weathering.

Review:

TYPHOON is an edgy political thriller about modern-day pirates planning a massive attack on North and South Korea.

The opening scene depicts a group of pirates hijacking a vessel near northeast Taiwan. The bandits manage to steal a nuclear guidance kit, which garners the attention of the National Intelligence Service. The Service sends naval lieutenant Kang, Se-jong (Lee Jung-jae) to investigate the matter. Kang learns that Sin (Jang Dong-gun) is the mastermind behind the heist and seeks to bring him to justice. Kang also discovers that Sin’s criminal actions are rooted in his bitter hatred for both the North and South Korean governments.

Upon recognizing China, South Korea had denied asylum to Sin's parents, who were then ruthlessly killed by the North Koreans in cahoots with China. Although he and his sister managed to escape their parents’ fate, the orphans were separated and forced to fend for themselves.

Kang is obviously sympathetic to Sin’s childhood tragedy and sometimes appears conflicted about his mission. Still, Kang sets out to do whatever it takes to capture the shrewd outlaw.

Although the story has potential to be very compelling, TYPHOON never quite gels into the edge-of-your-seat political thriller it’s trying to be. The plot is uneven and often unbelievable. Most of the action scenes aren’t very exciting, and the movie is probably too long and too violent for most tastes.

With a mixed pagan worldview, foul language, graphic violence, and a central theme of revenge, TYPHOON is not a storm worth weathering.

In Brief:

TYPHOON is a political thriller about modern-day pirates planning a massive attack on North and South Korea. Bandits steal a nuclear guidance kit after they hijack a vessel near Taiwan, which garners the attention of the National Intelligence Service. The Service sends naval lieutenant Kang to investigate. Kang identifies the mastermind behind the heist and seeks to bring him to justice. Kang discovers that Sin’s criminal actions are rooted in his bitter hatred for the Korean government, which ruthlessly killed his parents when the family was attempting to defect to South Korea. Kang is obviously sympathetic to Sin’s childhood tragedy and sometimes appears conflicted about his mission. Still, Kang sets out to do whatever it takes to capture the shrewd outlaw.

Although the story has potential to be very compelling, TYPHOON never gels into the edge-of-your-seat thriller it’s trying to be. The plot is uneven and often unbelievable. Most of the action scenes aren’t very exciting, and the movie is probably too long and too violent for most tastes. With a pagan worldview, foul language, graphic violence, and a central theme of revenge, TYPHOON is not a storm worth weathering.