WALK ON WATER Add To My Top 10

Much Ado about Tolerance

Content -3
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 04, 2005

Starring: Lior Ashkenazi, Knut Berger, Caroline Peters, and Gideon Shemer

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R for some language including
sexual references, and for
brief nudity

Runtime: 104 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films

Director: Eytan Fox

Executive Producer: Eytan Fox and Gal Uchovsky

Producer: Amir Harel

Writer: Gal Uchovsky

Address Comments To:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO
The Samuel Goldwyn Co.
10203 Santa Monica Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90067
Phone: (310) 552-2255
Fax: (310) 284-8493

Content:

(RoRo, PCPC, HoHoHo, LL, V, SS, NNN, A, MM) Strong Romantic worldview that sees the individual as tainted by society’s injustice and intolerance, with a politically correct theme about tolerance, and very strong pro-homosexual content, including a detailed discussion of homosexual sex, visit to homosexual bar and skinheads assault transvestites; 14 mostly strong obscenities; man kills terrorist with a lethal injection, fight breaks out when skinheads attack transvestites, and plug pulled on elderly Nazi; detailed discussion of homosexual acts and male genitals, man with homosexual lifestyle takes straight man to a homosexual club and transvestites shown; brief frontal male nudity at beach, but which is non-sexual; alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, strong revenge theme, man’s wife commits suicide, parents lie to their children about their family’s Nazi history, and euthanasia scene where man pulls the plug on his grandfather once the grandfather is exposed as a Nazi operative.

Summary:

WALK ON WATER could be subtitled “More Talk About Tolerance,” as this movie touches on topics as far flung as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Holocaust and homosexuality. Eyal, an Israeli hit man, is sent to kill one of the final living Nazi officers, but winds up befriending the Nazi’s homosexual grandson and changing his mission. WALK ON WATER substitutes fluff for substance, and politically correct truisms for complex thought and wisdom, and contains a detailed discussion about homosexual acts.

Review:

WALK ON WATER could be subtitled “More Talk About Tolerance,” as this movie touches on topics as far flung as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Holocaust and homosexuality.

Eyal is an Israeli hit man who is sent to kill one of the final living Nazi officers. In order to find him, Eyal must befriend the officer’s grandchildren by posing as a tour guide in the Holy Land. The grandson, Axel, is fascinated with Israel and develops a genuine friendship with the hit man, which is labored when Axel reveals himself as homosexual. Even though Eyal is repulsed at this news, he must continue his correspondence with Axel to find the ex-Nazi.

WALK ON WATER is poised to make some interesting comments on our shared humanity in the face of national conflicts, but it takes the easy way out and settles for a politically correct message of general tolerance. Eyal’s transformative lesson, that Axel is an ordinary person even though he’s gay, is so cartoonishly obvious that it harkens back to Huckleberry Finn’s realization that Jim is a real person even though Jim’s not white.

Axel euthanizes his grandfather once his Nazi past is revealed. Eyal, on the other hand, has the opportunity to kill the Nazi grandfather but declines, since he now sees a personal context surrounding the monster. Both of them feel that society has forced twisted rules onto their lives, and both are seeking to amend the past. This is definitional Romantic thinking.

The movie’s title refers to a dream that Eyal has once his life becomes more peaceful. Amazingly, the dream – Eyal and Axel walk on the water of the Sea of Galilee – has nothing to do with Jesus Christ or Christianity. It is the empty-headed sensation of tolerance that propels the men across the water. This substitution of contemporary fluff for lasting substance is emblematic of a movie that values truisms over complex thought and wisdom. WALK ON WATER also contains a detailed discussion of homosexual acts.

In Brief:

WALK ON WATER could be subtitled “More Talk about Tolerance,” because it touches on far-flung topics as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Holocaust and homosexuality. Eyal, an Israeli hit man, is sent to kill one of the final living Nazi officers. To find him, Eyal befriends the officer’s homosexual grandson, Axel, by posing as a tour guide. Axel euthanizes his grandfather once his Nazi past is revealed. Eyal, on the other hand, declines the chance to kill the Nazi grandfather, since he now sees a personal context surrounding the monster. Both feel that society has forced twisted rules onto their lives, reflecting a Romantic worldview.

WALK ON WATER seemed poised to make some interesting comments on people’s shared humanity in the face of national conflicts, but it takes the easy way out and settles for a politically correct message of tolerance. The title refers to Eyal’s dream of him and Axel walking on water, but it has nothing to do with Jesus Christ. Instead, the empty-headed sensation of tolerance propels the men across the water. This substitution of fluff for substance is emblematic of a movie that values truisms over complex thought and wisdom.