YI YI

Family Life without Christ

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Nien-Jen Wu, Elaine Jin, Issey
Ogata, Kelly Lee, & Jonathan
Chang

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older children & adults

Rating: Not rated

Runtime: 129 minutes

Distributor: Winstar Cinema

Director: Edward Yang

Executive Producer:

Producer: Shinya Kawai, Osamu Kunota,
Naoko Tsukeda, & Wei-yen Yu

Writer: Edward Yang

Address Comments To:

No address available.

Content:

(FR, B, O, H, LL, V, SS, N, AA, D, M) False religious worldview which makes strong moral points & involves a few occult elements as well as a humanist leading character; 22 obscenities, teacher accuses a little boy of having a condom & a few shots of people relieving themselves; fighting heard off screen, attempted suicide, fighting for baby, murder off-screen but blood shown & murder symbolized by computer game; fornication heard & implied, fornication rejected, pornographic movie heard but not seen, & adultery rejected; nude little boy & shadow nudity; drinking & drunkeness; smoking, and, lying & cheating.

Summary:

YI YI is an award-winning Asian movie that tells the story of an extended Chinese family living in Taipei. YI YI is a well-crafted look at life in a very contemporary, westernized Eastern culture. The only things that seem to be missing are a strong biblical worldview and the hope that alone can be found in Jesus Christ.

Review:

Internationally acclaimed national Chinese movie YI YI tells the story of an extended Chinese family living in Taipei. The movie opens with a wedding where the bride-to-be is very pregnant. Her husband to be, Liang, waited for the luckiest day to have the wedding, according to their horoscopes. Liang's grandmother does not accept his bride, and Liang’s former lover disrupts the wedding.

The grandmother goes home. Granddaughter Ting-Ting tries to clean up the apartment, but she forgets one of the garage bags when her father NJ takes her back to the wedding.

At the wedding, NJ is concerned about his 8-year-old son, Yang-Yang, who won’t eat because the little girls at the wedding are teasing him. NJ takes his son out for fast food.

When he returns, he accidentally meets Sherry at the elevator, who was his first love 30 years ago in high school. Sheri makes it clear that she wants to hear from him.

When NJ and his family arrive home after the wedding, they find out that the grandmother fell next to the garbage and is in a coma.

Eventually, they bring grandmother home from the hospital, still in a coma. Min-Min the wife tries to talk to her, but finds that she has nothing to say to her mother. Min-Min is so devastated by the emptiness of her life and the condition of her mother that she goes off to a Buddhist retreat, which is clearly mocked as a cult.

NJ’s computer company, meanwhile, is suffering huge losses. He is appointed to make a deal with the leading Japanese game developer. He calls Sherry on the way to Japan and meets her on this business trip.

Meanwhile, little Yang-Yang, an adorable boy and great actor, is being harassed by everyone at school, including his teacher. It is clear that Yang-Yang wants to do the right thing and is the future of the family.

Many other complications occur with other family members, as well as neighbors. The next door mother and daughter are having many affairs, as well as many yelling and screaming matches. Eventually, one of the neighbors’ boyfriends kills another one of the neighbors’ boyfriends. Through all of these complications, NJ is the moral compass for the movie.

YI YI is a very complex and rich film. The director shows the frailty of human existence without dwelling on the ugliness. The director, Edward Yang, does not actually show the murder that takes place, but rather symbolizes it with a computer game murder, and the adultery and fornication also occur off screen.

However, in spite of the fact that the movie has a moral point, this is a world where immoral activity occurs often, including cursing, adultery, fornication, and murder. Furthermore it’s a world where superstition controls the lives of many of the characters, although NJ rejects superstition.

YI YI is a well-crafted look at life in a very contemporary, westernized Eastern culture. The only things that seem to be missing are a strong biblical worldview and the hope that alone can be found in Jesus Christ.

In Brief:

YI YI is an award-winning Asian movie that tells the story of an extended Chinese family living in Taipei. Many complications occur within the family, as well as with their neighbors. Those complications include an grandparent in a coma, a father who flirts with adultery, a mother devastated by the emptiness of her life, an adorable boy being harassed at school, and a murder in the neighborhood.

YI YI is a very complex and rich movie. The director, Edward Yang, shows the frailty of human existence without dwelling on the ugliness. He does not actually show the murder that takes place, but rather symbolizes it with a computer game murder, and the fornications also occur off screen. However, in spite of the fact that the movie has a moral point, this is a world where immoral activity occurs often, including cursing, adultery, fornication, and murder. Furthermore it’s a world where superstition controls the lives of many of the characters, although the father rejects superstition. YI YI is a well-crafted look at life in a very contemporary, westernized Eastern culture. The only things that seem to be missing are a strong biblical worldview and Jesus Christ