ZEBRAHEAD Add To My Top 10

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 23, 1992

Starring: Michael Rapaport, N'Bushe Wright, DeShonn Castle, Ron Johnson, Bobby Travis, Abdul Hassan Sharif, & Lz Granderson.

Genre: Racial drama/romance

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 minutes

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Content:

(H, LLL, V, S, A/D) A humanist worldview complete with: over 50 obscenities & 2 profanities; man murdered by gunshot wound to chest; implied fornication; and, alcohol abuse & implied drug abuse.


Summary:

ZEBRAHEAD is the story of a rap-loving Jewish high school student who falls in love with a black woman. ZEBRAHEAD is a balanced portrait of racial tensions in the inner-city, regrettably marred by over 50 obscenities, implied sexual immorality, a casual attitude toward adolescent sex, and alcohol abuse.


Review:

ZEBRAHEAD examines race relations from the perspective of a Jewish high school student who falls in love with a woman of color. The story begins with Zack and his best friend Dee, a good-natured black classmate. When Dee's beautiful cousin Nikki moves to town, Zack falls in love with her. As Zack and Nikki become romantically involved, their relationship sparks friction between their classmates, their parents and the community. Zack and Nikki's love affair provokes anger and resentment from those around them. Zack's white classmates think Zack is romancing Nikki as a sexual novelty, while her black friends think she's becoming a white man's whore.
ZEBRAHEAD contains situations that will offend moral individuals. Zack and Nikki's casual attitude about sex, his father's promiscuous behavior, Nikki's mother's alcohol abuse, and the foul language. However, writer/director Anthony Drazan can be lauded for the fact that there is no gratuitous violence, nor are there any graphic sex scenes, and a number of the characters exhibit moral decency. All in all, ZEBRAHEAD works hard to present a balanced portrait of life in the inner city, and reminds us that true change must come from our inner convictions.


In Brief: