BREAKFAST WITH SCOT Add To My Top 10

Homosexual Propaganda as Comedy

Content -3
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 10, 2008

Starring: Tom Cavanagh, Ben Shenkman, Noah Bernett, Benz Antoine, Colin Cunningham, and Graham Greene

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 95 minutes

Distributor: Regent Releasing

Director: Laurie Luynd

Executive Producer: Howard Rosenman and Nadine Schiff

Producer: Paul Brown

Writer: Sean Reycraft

Address Comments To:

Stephen Jarchon, Chairman
John Lambert, President
Regent Releasing
10990 Wilshire Blvd., Penthouse
Los Angeles, CA 90024
Phone: (310) 806-4278
Fax: (310) 806-4268
Website: www.regentreleasing.com
Email: [email protected]

Content:

(RoRoRo, HoHoHo, LL, V, S, N, A, DD, M) Very strong Romantic homosexual worldview; 17 obscenities, four profanities and seven homosexual slurs; multiple fights in context of hockey game, including young boys fighting; implied homosexual activity, homosexual men give perfunctory kiss on lips and cross-dressing by pre-teenage boy; upper male nudity and woman appears in underwear; drinking of wine and beer; no smoking or drug use, but discussion of drug overdose; and, lying and an opportunist is after money.

Summary:

BREAKFAST WITH SCOT is the story of Eric, a homosexual man who lives “in the closet” but must suddenly face his own homosexuality when has “partner’s” 11-year-old “step-nephew” comes to live with them and exhibits clear signs of being homosexual himself. The movie presents the disturbing message that homosexuals must all “come out” and be accepted and that male homosexuals should adopt young boys.

Review:

BREAKFAST WITH SCOT is the story of Eric, a homosexual man who lives “in the closet” but must suddenly face his own homosexuality when his “partner’s” 11-year-old “step-nephew” comes to live with them and exhibits clear signs of being homosexual himself.

Eric has a good life after a career-ending hockey injury for Toronto Maple Leafs leads him to a job as sports announcer. He lives with his boyfriend who is an attorney. However, all that changes when a young boy, Scot, comes to live with them for a few weeks after the death of his single mom. Scot is dealing with the death of his mom and wears her jewelry, make-up and clothes. He has many effeminate gestures and habits, which lead Eric and his partner, Sam, to conclude that Scot is homosexual.

Eric is concerned, however, that Scot will be picked on, so he teaches Scot hockey and how to fight. Eric struggles with the admission of his own homosexuality as he’s concerned that his career may be in jeopardy if anyone finds out.

Sam’s brother, the guardian of Scot, finally shows up, but the question becomes, with whom does Scot want to live? Should he choose the no-good opportunist guardian or the two homosexual men?

Objectionable content aside, the movie’s strength is in the performances. Tom Cavanaugh as Eric and Noah Bernett as Scot do a remarkable job of walking many fine lines with their acting. The script is well paced with enough emotion and humor to keep the viewers engaged.

There’s foul language, though not an excessive amount compared to many of today’s movies. One heterosexual man appears with his shirt off.

Even so, the message and point of the movie is thoroughly negative. The point of the movie is that all homosexuals must be accepted, and they must “come out.” Adoption of a young pre-teenage boy by a male homosexual couple is not only allowed, but encouraged. This is a movie where good is evil, and evil is good. The movie’s real danger is that the homosexual message is presented dramatically and in an engaging manner, thus having the effect of mainstreaming all kinds of sexual immorality, not just homosexuality.

Needless to say, media-wise viewers will not want to support movies like BREAKFAST WITH SCOT.

In Brief:

BREAKFAST WITH SCOT is a comedy that pushes the homosexual agenda. Eric, a sports announcer, lives “in the closet” with his homosexual partner. Eric must suddenly face his own homosexuality when his partner’s 11-year-old “step-nephew,” Scot, comes to live with them and exhibits clear signs of being homosexual. Eric is concerned that Scot will be picked on, so he teaches him hockey and how to fight. Eric struggles with admission of his own homosexual lifestyle. He’s concerned his career may be in jeopardy if anyone finds out about his perversion.

Objectionable content aside, the movie’s strength lies in the performances. Tom Cavanaugh as Eric and Noah Bernett as Scot do a remarkable job of walking many fine lines with their acting. The movie’s homosexual message is thoroughly abhorrent and wicked, however. The message is that all homosexual behavior must be accepted and publicly promoted. Adoption of a young pre-teenage boy by a male homosexual couple is not only allowed, but also encouraged. Of course, the movie’s real danger is that the message is presented dramatically, in an engaging manner. Media-wise viewers with biblical worldviews will not support movies like this.