EAT PRAY LOVE

Self-Indulgent Journey to New Age Darkness

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 13, 2010

Starring: Julia Roberts, James Franco,
Richard Jenkins, Viola Davis,
Billy Crudup, and Javier
Bardem

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 133 minutes

Distributor: Columbia Pictures/Sony
Pictures Entertainment

Director: Ryan Murphy

Executive Producer: Brad Pitt, Stan Wlodkowski and
Jeremy Kleiner

Producer: Dede Gardner

Writer: Ryan Murphy and Jennifer Salt

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO
Amy Pascal, Chairman - Motion Picture Group
Sony Pictures Entertainment (Columbia Pictures/TriStar/Screen Gems/Provident/Triumph Films)
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000; Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(PaPaPa, FRFRFR, RoRoRo, FeFeFe, B, LL, V, S, NN, AA, MM) Very strong mixed New Age pagan worldview extolling the false philosophies of Hinduism, Hindu idolatry, pantheism, Romantic ideals of self-indulgence, and a very strong feminist, negative view of marriage, plus some references to God but protagonist eventually favors Hinduism and New Age beliefs and some helping of others, but not with a Christian, biblical worldview focusing on the One True God; about 10 obscenities (including one “f” word), two strong profanities and five light profanities, plus a few vulgar phrases and an obscene gesture from a little girl; woman on bike gets hit by car and falls over and woman has scar on face from being beaten by husband; implied pre-marital fornication; rear and upper male nudity when man tries to seduce woman but she’s not buying it; alcohol use and drunkenness; no smoking or drugs; and, stealing at one point and selfishness.

Summary:

EAT PRAY LOVE stars Julia Roberts as a writer who finds New Age, personal darkness overseas in Hinduism. The movie’s episodic script meanders a bit and lacks real drama. It also contains an abhorrent pagan worldview with feminist values rejecting marriage.

Review:

Based on the popular book by Elizabeth Gilbert, EAT PRAY LOVE is a selfish celebration of Eastern anti-enlightenment and feminism without God.

The movie stars Julia Roberts as Liz Gilbert, a writer who suddenly decides she doesn’t like being married to her husband any more. Liz wants to find who she really is, because she feels she’s become too dispassionate about everything. In the third scene, Liz breaks down in the bathroom and starts praying to God. She asks God to tell her what to do.

Before her divorce is even finalized, however, she starts an affair with a younger man, David, who introduces her to Hindu polytheism. The affair goes badly, however, so Liz suddenly decides to take a year’s sabbatical overseas.

She starts by going to Italy, where she decides to develop a passion for food again. She makes friends with an Italian English student, conversing over dinner while she learns the country’s food and culture. At one point, the Italian and his family enjoy an American Thanksgiving Liz prepares, where they thank God over the dinner.

Then, Liz decides to visit India to look up her former lover’s Hindu guru. At the guru’s place, she gets into Hinduism, including Hindu meditation, really heavily. She also befriends a young Indian girl going into an arranged marriage and a troubled former alcoholic who’s lost his family. From all these experiences, Liz comes to believe in meditation and pantheism, where the believer uses meditation to become like God. She also comes to believe she has to forgive herself, not apologize to the people she’s harmed, especially her former husband, who seems to be a decent, sincere man.

Finally, Liz heads to Bali to consult an elderly spiritual healer and fortune teller she had met before. In Bali, Liz helps a battered wife, finds further spiritual anti-enlightenment and a new lover.

EAT PRAY LOVE has good production values, but its episodic script meanders a bit and lacks real drama. The biggest problem, however, is that the female protagonist is a selfish woman trying to find personal enlightenment and happiness apart from the God of the Bible. Sadly, she jumps from man to man. Even worse, she eventually finds spiritual darkness in the false religion of Hinduism and pantheism, the belief that everyone is god or has a piece of god inside herself.

Another problem with the movie is it presents a negative, feminist view of marriage. There is also some foul language and sexual situations, but, except for an “f” word and a couple strong profanities, nothing really explicit. There is also one scene where a man takes off his clothes and unsuccessfully tries to seduce the protagonist.

EAT PRAY LOVE is an annoying movie extolling abhorrent New Age Hindu beliefs and feminist values rejecting marriage.

In Brief:

Based on the popular book by Elizabeth Gilbert, EAT PRAY LOVE is a selfish celebration of Eastern anti-enlightenment and feminism without God. The movie stars Julia Roberts as Liz Gilbert, a writer who suddenly decides she wants to divorce her husband. Although she asks God for help, Liz starts an affair with a younger man, David, who introduces her to Hindu polytheism. This eventually leads to India and Bali, where Liz continues her New Age search for spirituality in Hindu theology. Eventually, she takes on a new lover. Along the way, Liz enjoys some culinary delights in Italy.

EAT PRAY LOVE has good production values, but its episodic script meanders and lacks real drama. The biggest problem, however, is that the female protagonist is a selfish woman trying to find personal darkness apart from God. Sadly, she jumps from man to man. Even worse, she eventually finds spiritual anti-enlightenment in the false religions of Hinduism and pantheism, the belief that everyone is god or has a piece of god inside herself. EAT PRAY LOVE is an annoying movie extolling abhorrent New Age Hindu beliefs and feminist values rejecting marriage.