TAKE THE LEAD

Familiar Steps

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 07, 2006

Starring: Antonio Banderas, Rob Brown, Yaya DaCosta, Dante Basco, and John Ortiz

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 108 minutes

Address Comments To:

Mark Ordesky, President
Fine Line Features
Robert Shaye and Michael Lynne
Co-Chairman/Co-CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811
Fax: (310) 854-1453
Web Page: www.flf.com

Content:

(B, C, Pa, LLL, V, MM) Light moral worldview in which main character reaches out to those less fortunate with acts of compassion and love and one character receives comfort by holding a gold cross when he sleeps, mitigated by some light pagan elements; about 47 mostly light obscenities and three profanities; one scene of mild violence portraying a man bashing a car with a golf club and a couple of scenes in which punches are thrown; no sexual content, although one character’s mother is a prostitute; no nudity; talk of alcoholism, but clearly depicted negatively; no smoking or drug use; and, disrespect towards authority, snobby behavior, vandalism, and stolen merchandise sold in the black market.

Summary:

TAKE THE LEAD is an urban drama about a celebrated dance instructor from Manhattan that volunteers to offer his expertise to a group of troubled high-school students in a rough part of the Bronx. The movie contains plenty of foul language and mild violence, but it also has a light moral worldview and an inspiring message.

Review:

AKE THE LEAD dances to familiar steps, but it shares a positive story with an uplifting message of compassion and love.

In this urban drama based on a true story, Pierre Dulaine (Antonio Banderas) is a celebrated dance instructor from Manhattan who volunteers to offer his expertise to a group of troubled high-schoolers in a rough part of the Bronx. The tough-minded principal, Augustine James (Alfre Woodard), isn't too open to the idea, but eventually she allows Dulaine to instruct a motley group of rambunctious hoodlums during their regular stay at detention. Likewise, Dulaine's subjects aren't thrilled with the idea of learning the fine art of ballroom dancing, but they warm up to his teaching after he demonstrates his moves with a beautiful dance partner.

As the students learn Dulaine's highbrow dance steps, they begin to incorporate their own hip-hop inspired swagger, giving them a style all their own. Their quick improvement compels Dulaine to enter them into a contest with the finest dancers in all of New York.

Most moviegoers have already heard the song TAKE THE LEAD sings, whether it was in LEAN ON ME, STAND AND DELIVER, TO SIR WITH LOVE, DANGEROUS MINDS, or even GOODBYE MR. CHIPS. Each of these movies features a fish-out-of-water character who reaches out to troubled kids by teaching them the importance of discipline, self-confidence and love. TAKE THE LEAD, which is inspired by the true story of Pierre Dulaine, simply adds a dancing twist to a common story. This type of story is often retold, of course, because it is an uplifting formula that audiences enjoy. And, audiences will enjoy TAKE THE LEAD.

Dulaine volunteers his time to instruct unappreciative, unloved teenagers; services for which he is well-paid in his Manhattan studio. He humbles himself for the sake of the less fortunate, and eventually wins them over and becomes their role model, the only positive role model they have. This Christ-like love is the focus on the movie.

TAKE THE LEAD contains plenty of foul language and mild violence, and is not suitable for children. However, with a light moral worldview and an inspiring message, TAKE THE LEAD dances to familiar steps worth taking.

In Brief:

TAKE THE LEAD is an urban drama about Pierre Dulaine, a celebrated dance instructor from Manhattan who volunteers to offer his expertise to a group of troubled high-school students in a rough part of the Bronx. The tough-minded principal eventually allows Dulaine to instruct a motley group of hoodlums during their stay in detention. Dulaine's subjects soon warm up to ballroom dancing, and begin to incorporate their own hip-hop inspired swagger in their moves, giving them a style all their own. Their quick improvement compels Dulaine to enter them into a contest with the finest New York dancers. Dulaine teaches them the importance of discipline, self-confidence and love in the process.

Most moviegoers have already heard the song TAKE THE LEAD sings, whether it was in LEAN ON ME, STAND AND DELIVER or TO SIR WITH LOVE. TAKE THE LEAD dances to familiar steps, but it shares a positive story with an uplifting message of compassion and love. The movie contains plenty of foul language and mild violence, and is not suitable for children. However, with a light moral worldview and an inspiring message, TAKE THE LEAD tells a story worth repeating.