EQUINOX

Content:

(H, LL, NN, M, SS, VV) Humanism; 7 obscenities & 4 profanities; adultery shown on two occasions, referred to on many occasions; blackmail; and, three murders shown.

Summary:

EQUINOX consists of many diverse characters, plots and story lines which have the potential to create an entertaining film but fail to come together in an understandable fashion. The characters gyrate in a meaningless web of bewilderment throughout the two-hour film, and the viewer leaves in a dumbfounded state since only writer/director Rudolph knows the ultimate meaning of the film.

Review:

EQUINOX consists of many diverse characters, plots and story lines which have the potential to create an entertaining film if they were tied together in some fashion that could be understood by the audience. Initially, a homeless woman collapses on a city street and is pronounced dead at the morgue. An employee of the morgue steals her one possession–a letter–and uses the ideas it contains for a novel she is writing. The letter also tells about the woman’s twin sons to whom she has left millions. In the beginning of the film, one assumes the movie will revolve around her search for the twins–not so, the morgue employee only briefly re-surfaces after the opening scene. Neither of the twins knows about the existence of the other. All of the characters in the movie are disturbed in some way, but the filmmaker never ties them together for the viewer.
As one watches EQUINOX, he begs for a connection or an explanation but the film fails to provide it. The direction on many occasions is poor. There are many references to less than moral situations, and the confused state of all the characters promotes a distinct distraction for the viewer. The characters gyrate in a meaningless web of bewilderment throughout the entire two-hour movie leaving the viewer in a confused state as to the ultimate meaning of the film.

In Brief:

EQUINOX

Content:

(LL, VV, S, N) 13 obscenities & 9 profanities; multiple shootings & fistfights; sexual immorality implied; and, brief female nudity on TV screens.

Summary:

EQUINOX is a surprisingly inept and murky tale of twin brothers separated at birth and eventually reunited at a violent shoot-out. Perhaps intended as satire, but not at all successful, this film is bogged down with performances uniformly driven to caricature and countless lines which are outright groaners. This, plus a highly unsatisfying ending, an ample collection of cuss words and nudity, make EQUINOX a film well worth avoiding.

Review:

EQUINOX is a basic “good twin/bad twin separated at birth” story, with the brothers’ paths intersecting only in a final, violent shoot-out. Henry (Matthew Modine) is a shy, nerdy mechanic who works with adoptive father Pete. Henry is perennially hassled and abused by everyone in his neighborhood. Twin brother Freddy is just the opposite: smooth, aggressive, tough, and working himself into the hierarchy of a local crime boss. As these two pursue their parallel plot lines, it is Henry who becomes increasingly like the brother he has never met. He plays a crude self-defense video around the clock, and in a moment of rage, shoves a local bully down a flight of stairs. He also revs up his love life. Eventually, the brothers meet amidst much gunfire; but no one comes out ahead in this ambivalent, convoluted and unsatisfying climax.
The film boasts a competent writer-director, accomplished cinematographer, and a collection of talented actors and actresses, but this murky tale is surprisingly inept. Perhaps intended as satire, but not successful, the film bogs down with performances uniformly driven to caricature, countless lines which are outright groaners and atrocious writing and directing which pollute EQUINOX from beginning to end. All this, plus a highly unsatisfying ending, an ample collection of cuss words and female nudity on television, make EQUINOX a film well worth avoiding.

In Brief: