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THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.

"Disappointing Ending"

Watch:

What You Need To Know:

Like the 1960s TV show, THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. takes place in the 1960s. An origin story, the movie opens with the CIA’s top spy, Napoleon Solo, spiriting the daughter of a disappeared nuclear scientist away from East Berlin. Relentlessly pursuing them is Illya Kuryakin, a physically imposing Soviet spy. Their bosses inform Solo and Kuryakin the girl’s father is making a nuclear bomb an Italian couple plans to sell to a Neo-Nazi group. They order Napoleon and Illya to work with one another to help the daughter ingratiate herself with the Italians, rescue the father and his notes, and stop the bomb from being sold.

THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. starts off with an exciting beginning. There’s also a nifty twist leading into the movie’s third act. Sadly, the third act fizzles out, with a couple unexciting action sequences and an anticlimactic ending. Happily, there’s very little foul language in THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. Also, the movie has a strong moral worldview with anti-socialist, patriotic content. However, there’s some innuendo, brief nudity and some intense violence. So strong caution is advised.

Content:

(BB, PP, ACAC, Pa, L, VV, S, NN, AA, D, M) Strong moral, patriotic, anti-communist, and anti-fascist worldview, mitigated by some pagan immorality; three obscenities and no profanities; some intense action violence includes a car chase, fighting, commando raid with a high body count among soldiers, explosions, derring do, Nazi scientist administers electric shock to one hero, henchmen shoot machine guns at heroes, man almost drowns, henchman dies a gruesome death by fire that’s played humorously, vehicles crash; implied adulterous sex, married villain flirts with unmarried heroine, and woman takes off her clothes in front of man posing as her fiancé to make him mad and flirt with him; rear female nudity in one scene with side view of woman’s breast from behind; alcohol use and light drunkenness in one scene; smoking; and, some moral relativism, good spies deceive people and break into vault to accomplish mission, woman’s uncle insults her supposed fiancé.

More Detail:

Like the 1960s TV show, THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. takes place in the 1960s, in an origin story where a suave American spy teams up with a Russian spy to stop a nuclear weapon from being sold to a Neo-Nazi group. The movie starts out really promising, with a nice twist in the second act, but the third act is anti-climactic and not exciting. Though it has very little foul language, THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. has some innuendo, brief nudity and some intense violence, including a torture sequence involving electric shock and faulty wiring.

The movie opens with CIA spy Napoleon Solo spiriting the daughter of a disappeared nuclear scientist away from East Berlin. Relentlessly pursuing them is Illya Kuryakin, a physically imposing Soviet spy.

Their bosses inform Solo and Kuryakin that the girl’s father is making a nuclear bomb that an Italian couple plans to sell to a Neo-Nazi group. They order them to work with one another to help the daughter ingratiate herself with the Italians and get back her father, the bomb and her father’s notes, which are on a computer disk. The Italian couple plans to use the notes to make other nuclear bombs using the father’s new process.

THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. starts off with an exciting beginning. There’s also a nifty twist that leads into the movie’s third act. Sadly, the third act fizzles out, with a couple unexciting action sequences and an anticlimactic ending. The third act also begins with some talky dialogue that slows down the plot before the action revs up again.

Happily, there’s very little foul language in THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. Also, Solo and Kuryakin make a heroic team while the movie still makes some strong criticisms of the Soviet Union’s oppressive communist regime. On the negative side, there is a scene where the married male villain makes a pass at the nuclear scientist’s daughter. Also, there’s an implied bedroom scene between Napoleon Solo and the male villain’s evil wife, plus brief rear female nudity in a third scene. Finally, there’s lots of action violence. In addition, a Nazi scientist tortures Solo by using electric shock. The scientist gets his just desserts, but in a gruesome way that’s played for laughs.

All in all, therefore, MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. warrants strong caution. Henry Cavill does a good job imitating original actor Robert Vaughn’s cool delivery, and the other actors do a good job too. So, fans of the TV series will like parts of the movie version, but the ending probably will disappoint them and other moviegoers as well.

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