BABYFEVER Add To My Top 10

Content -1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Victoria Foyt, Frances Fisher, Elaine Kagan, Dinah Lenney, Zack Norman, Matt Salinger, & Eric Roberts

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime:

Distributor: Rainbow Releasing

Director: Henry Jaglom

Executive Producer:

Producer: Judith Wolinsky

Writer: Henry Jaglom & Victoria Foyt

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Content:

(C, LL, SS, PC, H, Ho) Brief, but positive portrayal of a Christian character; 4 Obscenities & 10 profanities (mostly "Oh my God"); somewhat frank discussions of reproductive processes, though for the most part not lewd or offensive; sexual immorality implied; viewpoints on childbearing and child-raising from a variety of perspectives, including feminist, agnostic, homosexual and evangelical Christian, all treated respectfully.

Summary:

BABYFEVER sets in motion (somewhat awkwardly) a rudimentary storyline whose main purpose is to reach a fascinating main event--a baby shower in which we literally eavesdrop on several highly engrossing conversations about having and raising children. The discussion of reproduction is frank, and the movie will not satisfy every taste, but overall this is one of the most interesting and original films in recent memory.

Review:

BABYFEVER sets in motion an initial storyline whose main purpose is to reach a fascinating main event--a baby shower in which we literally eavesdrop on several engrossing conversations about having and raising children. We hear from feminists, hedonists, traditionalists, singles, marrieds, homemakers, and, in two conversations, a clear-eyed evangelical Christian who is portrayed not only as fervent but also eloquent and sensitive. (How refreshing indeed it was to see a Christian portrayed as intelligent and sensitive.)

For some reason, presentation of the simple plot in the first half hour is distractingly amateurish, as though director Henry Jaglom were grinding his way through a school project. However, once the party kicks into high gear, the writing, performances and editing are startlingly effective. What this film shows with surprising candor is the inadequacy of today's moral anarchy to serve as the basis for having and raising children. BABYFEVER will not satisfy every taste. In a few spots the discussion of reproduction is frank, however, and a handful of obscenities erupt in a couple of scenes. But overall this is one of the most interesting and original films.

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