MOSTLY MARTHA Add To My Top 10

Finding Family Ties

Content -1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 16, 2002

Starring: Martina Gedeck, Maxine Foerste, Sergio Castellitto, Ulrich Thomsen, Sibylle Canonica, and August Zirner

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 107 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Classics

Director: Sandra Nettelbeck

Executive Producer:

Producer: Karl Baumgartner and Christoph Friedel

Writer: Sandra Nettelbeck

Address Comments To:

David Dinerstein & Ruth Vitale
Co-Presidents
Paramount Classics
A Division of Paramount Pictures
5555 Melrose Avenue
Chevalier Building
Los Angeles, CA 90038
Phone: (323) 956-2000
Fax: (323) 862-1012
Website: www.paramountclassics.com

Content:

(BB, Ro, L, S, N, A, D, M) Mostly moral worldview about taking care of needy family members and children and being open with other people, with a slight Romantic tone, in the philosophical sense; seven obscenities, one mild profanity and someone says, “Heaven knows” and “Thank God”; no violence; movie vaguely implies that man stays overnight after sharing a passionate kiss with woman, but marriage is eventually celebrated and minor pregnant character starts to have her baby; woman wears revealing underwear in non-sexual scene; light alcohol use; light smoking; and, arguing and female gourmet chef has trouble controlling her anger when customers complain.


Summary:

MOSTLY MARTHA is a poignant German comedy that tells what happens when a gourmet chef finds love and family when a tragedy leaves her sister’s daughter in her care. Despite a few objectionable elements, MOSTLY MARTHA is a delightful movie that handles some serious situations with a light, heartwarming touch.


Review:

MOSTLY MARTHA is a delightful, poignant comedy from Germany that tantalizes the taste buds and warms the heart. It’s one of the best foreign movies to hit the United States this year!
Martina Gedeck stars in the title role as Martha, the head chef at a gourmet restaurant in Hamburg, Germany. Martha is a perfectionist who relies on her culinary skills to communicate with people. She lives for her work, however, which sometimes makes it difficult whenever she feels customers unfairly complain about the food.
One day, a fatal traffic accident leaves Lina, Martha’s 8-year-old niece, in her care. Lina is the result of a fling that Martha’s sister had when she went to Italy, and her father is not easily located. While Martha tries to meet Lina’s physical and emotional needs shortly after the accident, the owner of Martha’s restaurant hires a charming and carefree Italian chef, Mario, to replace the pregnant female chef under Martha. This upsets Martha, who’s also having problems relating to Lina, who refuses to eat Martha’s cooking.
Comical complications ensue from these two situations. Gradually, Martha finds love, family and the beginnings of a new recipe for life.
MOSTLY MARTHA is a wonderful movie, which, except for a scene with Martha in her underwear, some light foul language and light sexual innuendo, would be a nearly perfect cinematic feast for almost the entire family. The underwear scene is a little bit too revealing, however, though the context is not a sexual one. There is also a scene where Mario and Martha share a passionate kiss after Martha lets Mario cook dinner for her and Lina one night. In the next scene following the kissing scene, the movie shows Mario, fully clothed, cooking what apparently is breakfast for Martha and Lina. Thus, the movie implies that Mario spent the night with Martha.
MOSTLY MARTHA also deals frankly with the pain that a child can have when losing her mother in an awful accident. This material, however, is done tastefully and dramatically. Best of all, it has an uplifting resolution that is quite moving, though the movie makes clear, of course, that a child will never completely get over the death of a parent, especially a tragic one like the one in the movie.
Martina Gedeck, Maxine Foerste and Sergio Castellitto as Martha, Lina and Mario are an absolute delight in this movie. They deftly handle both the comical scenes and the dramatic scenes. Sandra Nettelbeck’s writing and direction are also impeccable! For a welcome change, the photography in this movie is crisp and clear.
The only things missing in this excellent German production are a God-centered and Christ-centered worldview. The ending, however, contains a heartwarming celebration of marriage, family and life that lightens the heavy loads we all have to carry in this fallen world of ours. That is no small accomplishment!


In Brief:

The German comedy MOSTLY MARTHA focuses on a Martha, the head chef at a gourmet restaurant in Hamburg, Germany. Martha is a perfectionist who relies on her culinary skills to communicate with people. She lives for her work, however, which sometimes makes it difficult whenever she thinks customers unfairly complain about her cooking. One day, a fatal traffic accident leaves Lina, Martha’s 8-year-old niece, in her care. While Martha tries to meet Lina’s physical and emotional needs, the owner of Martha’s restaurant hires a charming, carefree Italian chef, Mario, to replace the pregnant female chef under Martha. This upsets Martha, who’s having problems relating to Lina, who refuses to eat Martha’s cooking. Comical and dramatic complications ensue.
MOSTLY MARTHA is a delightful, poignant comedy from Germany that tantalizes the taste buds and warms the heart. The actors are absolutely charming. Sandra Nettelbeck’s writing and direction are also impeccable. Parents of older children, however, might be concerned about several obscenities in the movie, the death of Lina’s mother, and a brief scene where Martha walks around her apartment in her underwear. Even so, it is heartwarming celebration of marriage, family and life