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Erin Napier Announces Future Television Plans for the HOME TOWN Duo

Photo from Erin Napier’s Instagram

Erin Napier Announces Future Television Plans for the HOME TOWN Duo

By Movieguide® Staff

The newest show from HGTV’s famous duo Erin and Ben Napier, HOME TOWN TAKE OVER, was an instant hit for long-time fans. The “special event series” followed the couple as they traveled to Wetumpka, Alabama, to apply their renovation skills to an entire town, not just one house.

In May 2021, the couple premiered the new show and also welcomed their second child Mae. The couple also share their first daughter, Helen. In a recent Instagram post, Erin answered fans’ questions about their plans for future shows now that they have two daughters.

“We can FINALLY tell you officially, #HGTVHomeTown season 6 and #BensWorkshop season 2 are in production and coming in 2022. I am so proud of you, @scotsman.co!” she wrote on Instagram.

However, questions remained for fans about the possibility of a continuation of HOME TOWN TAKE OVER, which Erin addressed via Twitter.

“I’ll be honest, the takeover life is not all that simpatico with family life. it was an amazing adventure for us, but likely the only one like it until (maybe) our girls are much older,” she said.

Erin and Ben are also outspoken about their faith and their commitment to the church and raising their children on biblical principles.

Read Also: HOME TOWN’s Erin Napier: Doctors ‘Worked a Miracle’ After Their 3-Year-Old’s Leg Injury

In a recent Instagram post, Erin shared a quote from C.S. Lewis about how God brings peace to those who believe in Him.

“CS lewis gave me enormous comfort today, with words from 1948,” Erin wrote, “whether a bomb or a virus.”

Erin quoted:

“In one way we think a great deal too much of the atomic bomb. ‘How are we to live in an atomic age?’ I am tempted to reply: ‘Why, as you would have lived in the sixteenth century when the plague visited London almost every year, or as you would have lived in a Viking age when raiders from Scandinavia might land and cut your throat any night; or indeed, as you are already living in an age of cancer, an age of syphilis, an age of paralysis, an age of air raids, an age of railway accidents, an age of motor accidents.’

In other words, do not let us begin by exaggerating the novelty of our situation. Believe me, dear sir or madam, you and all whom you love were already sentenced to death before the atomic bomb was invented: and quite a high percentage of us were going to die in unpleasant ways. We had, indeed, one very great advantage over our ancestors—anesthetics; but we have that still. It is perfectly ridiculous to go about whimpering and drawing long faces because the scientists have added one more chance of painful and premature death to a world which already bristled with such chances and in which death itself was not a chance at all, but a certainty.

This is the first point to be made: and the first action to be taken is to pull ourselves together. If we are all going to be destroyed by an atomic bomb, let that bomb when it comes find us doing sensible and human things—praying, working, teaching, reading, listening to music, bathing the children, playing tennis, chatting to our friends over a pint and a game of darts—not huddled together like frightened sheep and thinking about bombs. They may break our bodies (a microbe can do that) but they need not dominate our minds.”