GOON

Don’t Judge a Man’s Heart by His Image

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 30, 2012

Starring: Seann William Scott, Jay
Baruchel, Eugene Levy, Alison
Pill, Liev Schreiber

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 91 minutes

Distributor: Magnet Releasing/Magnolia
Pictures

Director: Michael Dowse

Executive Producer: Mark Stone, Ben Silverman

Producer: Don Carmody, Ian Dimerman,
David Gross, Andre Rouleau,
Jesse Shapira

Writer: Jay Baruchel, Seth Goldberg

Address Comments To:

Bill Banowski, CEO, Magnolia Pictures (Magnet Releasing)
1614 West 5th St.
Austin, TX 78703
Eamon Bowles, President, Magnolia Pictures (Magnet Releasing)
43 West 27th St., 7th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 924-6701; Fax: (212) 924-6742
Website: www.magpictures.com; Email: info@ magpictures.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, B, PC, HoHo, LLL, VVV, SSS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Very strong, slightly mixed pagan worldview with some solid moral elements, plus a politically correct portrayal of a homosexual character who happens to be the hero’s brother, including two men kiss and pat each other’s posteriors; more than 180 obscenities and profanities, plus numerous crude sexual jokes including a few jokes by players taunting each other in which they kid that their mothers are crudely sexual; very frequent violence on the hockey rink, nearly from beginning to end, where players punch and shove each other relentlessly, often bloodying each other’s faces and mouths to a great extent, which is played largely for laughs and is the basis for the hero’s “stardom”; very strong sexual content includes fornication, sodomy, lewd dialogue, plus two men kiss; upper female nudity and upper male nudity; frequent alcohol drinking and drunkenness, both by lead characters and crowds of supporting characters, in bars, homes, locker rooms, and tour buses; two scenes where cocaine is snorted off naked bodies of women; women, one topless and one fully naked and being sexually used from behind; and, numerous scenes where coaches abuse their authority by telling players to be violent against their opponents and extreme partying.

Summary:

GOON is a very raunchy, violent comedy about a simple, somewhat sweet-natured man who finds he’s good at being a violent “enforcer” in professional hockey. Despite a couple positive elements, GOON is filled with constant foul language, raunchy comedy, and very strong fighting and hockey violence.

Review:

GOON is a very raunchy, violent comedy with a very strong pagan worldview that mixes light moral elements and a brief positive portrayal of a homosexual character. There are some surprisingly touching moments, however. Most of that’s due to a well-rounded performance by lead actor Seann William Scott, who plays a simple-minded, likeable man striving to make a mark in the world.



As the son and brother of doctors, Doug has felt worthless throughout most of his life, working dead-end jobs as a bar bouncer. Then, he attends a hockey game with his incessantly obscene best friend (Jay Baruchel). When Doug punches out a star player to defend his friend, Doug instantly gets hired by the knocked-out player’s team to provide entertainment by incessantly beating opponents.



Working hard, Doug becomes a good skater and starts to develop some actual skills. However, another team needs an “enforcer” to protect a star player who was traumatized by another “goon”. So, Doug gets shipped off to the big leagues. There, he finds himself surrounded by teammates who abuse drugs and alcohol and are promiscuous. Doug just wants to play and find a good woman to love.



Here, Scott portrays his character’s simple-minded innocence in beautiful fashion. He conveys Doug’s belief that his job is just as respectable as his doctor father, who doesn’t respect him and considers him to be a glorified security guard. In a well-written and acted speech, Doug tells his father he’s protecting his teammates’ well-being, the same thing a doctor does. He adds that his bond with his team is as unshakable as that of an actual family.



Doug eventually falls in love with a woman. However, she lives with a boyfriend, even though she speaks with regret about her promiscuous past. Ultimately, Doug’s drive, determination and inherent sweetness win her over. Their romance is portrayed as being driven by true love rather than the sexual nature of the movie’s other male-female relations.



Despite this positive content, the rest of the movie is filled with constant foul language, raunchy comedy, and very strong fighting and hockey violence. There’s also a politically correct portrayal of a homosexual character. Thus, although the filmmakers seem to realize viewers need something more than just endlessly raunchy content, such negative content is never very far from the screen, or the viewers.

In Brief:

GOON is a very raunchy, violent comedy. The story is about Doug, an aimless young man working dead-end jobs as a bar bouncer. The local minor league hockey team hires Doug when he punches out their star player, who threatened his friend. Doug suddenly finds his calling. He even starts to learn how to skate well. However, another team needs an “enforcer” to protect a star player traumatized by another “goon”. So, Doug gets shipped off to the big leagues. There, he finds himself surrounded by teammates who abuse drugs and alcohol and are promiscuous. Doug just wants to play and find a good woman.

The positive moments in GOON come from Seann William Scott’s performance as Doug. He plays Doug’s simple innocence in beautiful fashion. Even so, however, the rest of the movie is filled with constant foul language, raunchy comedy and very strong fighting and hockey violence. There is also a politically correct portrayal of a homosexual character. GOON’s filmmakers seem to realize viewers need something more than just raunchy, violent comedy, but such negative content is never very far from the screen, or the viewers.