A CHRISTMAS STORY

Content -1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 18, 1983

Starring: Peter Billingsley, Ian
Petrella, Mellinda Dillon,
Darren McGavin, & Scott
Schwartz.

Genre: Comedy

Audience:

Rating: Not submitted to MPAA

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United
Artists Company

Director: Bob Clark

Executive Producer:

Producer: Jean Shepherd

Writer: Rene Dupont & Bob Clark

Address Comments To:

Content:

(C, B, LL, V, S, M) Positive references to Jesus' birth (in Christmas carol) marred by: 8 obscenities & 2 exclamatory profanities; boy's fist fight results in bloody nose, firemen appear when youngster's tongue sticks to flagpole; slight sexual innuendo; and, hypocrisy & subtle implication that children are smarter than their parents.


Summary:


Review:

Families on the short stories of Midwestern humorist Jean Shepherd, A CHRISTMAS STORY is a 1940's family comedy about a 9-year-old who wants a Red Ryder BB gun for Christmas. Children may enjoy the movie, as it skillfully explores dilemmas and taboo subjects from their point-of-view and sense of humor. However, any positive qualities are marred by a subtle implication that children are a whole lot smarter than their parents. on the short stories of Midwestern humorist Jean Shepherd, A CHRISTMAS STORY is a family comedy about a 9-year-old who wants a Red Ryder BB gun for Christmas. The movie was originally released in 1983, and is now enjoying a limited theater showing for the holidays. The story begins with our young hero, Ralphie, eyeing the BB gun in the department store window. Putting a cork in his fun is Mom, who fears "you'll shoot your eye out, Ralphie!" Meanwhile, sibling Randy is stuck in a too-small snowsuit. Stepping into the winter air like a zombie from the crypt, he is barely able to move his arms or walk. What seems like more fun for boys and girls than adults, takes a turn when Dad wins an erotic leg-o-lamp in a sweepstakes. The movie continues with Ralphie's childhood musings, school experiences, a nightmarish visit with Santa, and a happy ending.
Children may enjoy the movie, as it skillfully explores dilemmas and taboo subjects from their point-of-view and sense of humor. However, the positive qualities are marred by a subtle implication that children are smarter than their parents. Anyone desiring a real Christmas story would be better off renting ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS (1991).


In Brief: