PALOOKAVILLE

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 25, 1996

Starring: William Forsythe, Vincent
Gallo, Adam Trese, & Frances
McDormand

Genre: Comedy

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 92 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn

Director: Alan Taylor EXECUTIVE
PRODUCER: Lindsay Law

Executive Producer:

Producer: Lindsay Law PRODUCER: Uberto
Pasolini

Writer: David Epstein

Address Comments To:

Content:

(Pa, C, LLL, VV, S, A, D, M) Pagan worldview with Christian prayer; 48 obscenities & 8 profanities; moderate violence including shooting, slapping, throwing objects, breaking & entering, & punching; briefly depicted sexual harassment, implied fornication, implied prostitution, & jokes about bestiality; alcohol use; smoking; and, stealing

Summary:

PALOOKAVILLE is a low-budget movie about three lower-class, unemployed men who plan the perfect crime to not become career criminals, but to experience a "momentary shift in lifestyle." This is a crime story without a crime about criminals who get rewarded for a good deed. With a pagan worldview, it also has many obscenities, moderate violence and implied fornication.

Review:

PALOOKAVILLE is a low-budget movie about three unemployed men who plan the perfect crime to experience a "momentary shift in lifestyle." This is a crime story without a crime about criminals who get rewarded for a good deed. The story begins in New Jersey when Jerry, Russ and Sid mistakenly break into a bakery which adjoins the targeted jewelry store. Russ robs the cash register, and they make a quick escape. Embarrassed, they regroup to plan an alternate crime. When an elderly driver of an armored truck passes out, the men come to his aid and take him to the hospital. Their good deed gives them an idea to rob an armored truck in a remote location. When their crime fails, the men are picked up and taken into the police station. There, they experience an unexpected honor which grants them, new and lawful opportunities.

While winsome, intelligent and funny, PALOOKAVILLE may be a hard sell to the American public. Too gritty, urban and dirty for rural "pop-corn" movie audience, it is also too warm and genteel for the crime story lover. Neither does it have sufficient action or charismatic leading men. PALOOKAVILLE shows godless men seeking godless solutions to their troubles. They punctuate their depravity with obscenities and desperate behavior. The movie would suggest that crime can pay in unexpected ways.

In Brief: