TAKING WOODSTOCK

The Sex and Drug Generation

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 26, 2009

Starring: Demetri Martin, Hendry Goodman, Imelda Staunton, Dan Fogler, Jonathan Groff, Eugene Levy, Emile Hirsch, and Live Schreiber

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 110 minutes

Distributor: Focus Features

Director: Ang Lee

Executive Producer: Michael Hausman

Producer: James Schamus, Ang Lee and Celia Costas

Writer: James Schamus

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey R. Immelt, Chairman/CEO
General Electric
James Schamus, President
Focus Features
A Division of NBC Universal and General Electric
65 Bleecker St., 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10012
Phone: (212) 539-4000
Fax: (212) 539-4099
Website: www.focusfeatures.com

Content:

(RoRoRo, HoHoHo, PaPa, Co, C, Fe, LLL, V, SS, NNN, AA, DDD, M) Very strong Romantic worldview with very strong homosexual content, a strong New Age pagan viewpoint, a positive sign about Communist Mao Tse Tung, a positive sign about Jesus, a feminist sign, anti-war signs, and some hippie signs signaling the movie’s New Age theme; at least 46 mostly strong obscenities (many “f” words), four strong profanities, three light profanities; light comic violence, such as woman chases young couple away that apparently was having sexual relations in bushes; depicted homosexual kiss, implied homosexual liaison in bedroom, implied fornication, and Korean War veteran shows up dressed as a woman; shots of full male and female nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking, marijuana use, use of LSD, psychedelic LSD trip shown as positive, implied eating of marijuana brownies makes older couple high; and, attacks on anti-hippie townspeople, greed.

Summary:

TAKING WOODSTOCK focuses on a young Jewish homosexual, who helped get the 1969 Woodstock music festival going, and his relationship with his parents, including his bitter, greedy Jewish mother. TAKING WOODSTOCK meanders a lot and reflects the very strong Romantic, New Age worldview at the time, the consequences of which society and people are still suffering today.

Review:

TAKING WOODSTOCK is being promoted as a celebration of what happened at the famous 1969 rock music festival near Woodstock, New York, but it’s really a family comedy about a domineering Jewish mother in the Catskills resorts. As such, it undermines the biblical premise to honor thy father and mother.

The story focuses on Elliot Tiber, the son of an older Jewish couple who ran the El Monaco Motel in Bethel, New York. Elliott manages the hotel for his parents while serving as president of the local Chamber of Commerce. His domineering mother expects Elliot to keep the motel going.

Elliot gets a permit to hold his annual arts festival, which he uses to attract visitors to the motel. When Elliot learns that a nearby village has turned down a permit to hold the Woodstock music festival, Elliot offers the concert company a chance to use his permit. They agree, but the area around the motel is too small, so Elliot contacts local dairy farmer Max Yasgur, who offers his 600-acre farm for $75,000.

The concert goers start to show up, but a stoned Elliot makes a confused press statement that makes it sound as if the concert is free. Elliot welcomes a Korean veteran dressed as a woman, who calls himself Vilma, to act as security for the motel. He also has a homosexual fling with an electrician working for the concert promoter and takes an acid trip with a hippie couple in a psychedelic van.

TAKING WOODSTOCK focuses on Elliot’s homosexuality, and his relationship with his mother and father. The mother comes across as mean, sullen and greedy, while the father is more laid back. Strangely, the movie never really gets to the music featured at the concert, but instead celebrates the antinomian freedom that the gathering represented. In that light, Elliot’s homosexuality takes center stage, and Elliot’s mother comes across as a bitter, greedy Jewish woman who holds him back.

TAKING WOODSTOCK meanders too much. Also, the dramatic conflicts that do occur are underplayed. The movie’s content reflects a very strong Romantic worldview along with a New Age syncretism. There are also scenes of full male and female nudity and scenes of drug use, including LSD.

In Brief:

TAKING WOODSTOCK focuses on Elliot, the son of an older Jewish couple who ran the El Monaco Motel in 1969 Bethel, New York. Elliott manages the hotel for his parents while serving as president of the local Chamber of Commerce. His domineering mother expects Elliot to keep the motel going. When Elliot learns a nearby village has turned down the Woodstock music festival, Elliot offers the concert company a chance to use his permit for an annual arts festival. They agree, so Elliot contacts dairy farmer Max Yasgur, who offers his 600-acre farm for $75,000. The concert goers start showing up, and Elliot’s relationship with his parents, especially his father, begins changing. He also discovers his homosexuality.

TAKING WOODSTOCK meanders too much. Also, it underplays the story’s dramatic conflicts. The movie reflects a very strong Romantic worldview along with a New Age paganism and many homosexual references. There are scenes of full male and female nudity. Elliot’s mother comes across as a bitter, greedy Jewish woman who holds him back. Strangely, the movie never covers the music played during the festival, the reason for the whole thing in the first place.