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What Kind of Streamer are You?

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

What Kind of Streamer are You?

By Allyson Vannatta, Senior Writer

A new study done by Hulu found that not all streamers are created equal. That is, not everyone uses streaming platforms in the same way.

The study, called “Generation Stream,” is the first in a series of studies to try and gain a better understanding of its users for marketers and producers.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Generation Stream focuses on how people use streaming platforms by identifying four types of streamers, their demographic, and psychographic traits of each group.

Julie DeTraglia, head of research and insights at Hulu said,

“Diving into the experiences and moods of Generation Stream further cements streaming TV as a foundational part of a viewer’s day.”

“The insights in this report uncover what inspires and moves this audience, so that Hulu and our partners can connect with them in meaningful ways, with content, brands and advertising. By exploring this coveted audience, who has been watching TV in a streaming environment for over a decade, Generation Stream helps us understand the why, who and how of streaming TV viewers, and will continue to do so in the coming reports.”

The first, and largest group, of users is what Hulu calls “therapeutic streaming.” These people use streaming to decompress and “lightly reflect.” The shows this group chooses to watch usually have a nostalgia factor and is close to the population as a whole demographically.

The second group, which is a quarter of the users, is called “classic streaming.” These streamers watch programs with family or friends at a set time and use it as part of a daily routine. This group is more likely to be married and are slightly more affluent.

Next is “indulgent streaming,” or binge-watchers. 21 percent of users fall into this group and will spend an entire weekend zipping through a season of the series they’re currently watching. The demographics for this group show these people are usually older and probably live by themselves.

Lastly, Hulu found a “curated streaming” group. The smallest of the four, it makes up only 13 percent of people. These streamers want to watch a movie or series that will start cultural conversations and are likely part of Generation Z.

Overall, the study found that 90 percent of people ages 13-54 have at least one streaming service. A larger trend also showed that most people like to use TV as a way to relax, meaning they don’t fully have to pay attention to something.

These numbers are important because they show how streaming can be a huge part of how families spend time together.

If families are making streaming part of their daily routine, it’s so important that parents practice media discernment before choosing what to watch with their children.

Furthermore, individuals who stream alone could be more prone to isolation, using media to mask the void meant to be filled my community.

While screen time can be entertaining, it can also have a damaging long-term impact.

Movieguide® Founder and Publisher Dr. Ted Baehr outlines in how parents can decide if a movie is family-friendly by asking certain questions.

The data was collected by a national survey of 2,500 people ages 13-54 during the month of April.

Which type of a streamer are you?